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I have an array:

[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

and I need to count three separate things.

1) All values less than or equal to 6.

2) All values equal to 7 or 8.

3) All values greater than 8.

What is the best way to do this without counting individual values and adding them all together?

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You mean add, or count frequency? –  zeantsoi Oct 12 '13 at 3:50
    
loop through the array once. And do all the operations in that. –  0v3rc10ck3d Oct 12 '13 at 3:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

arr.select {|e| e <= 6}.size
#=> 6

arr.select {|e| e == 7 || e == 8}.size 
#=> 2

arr.select {|e| e > 8}.size 
#=> 2
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This seems to be the cleanest way to find the values I need. Thanks! –  Luigi Oct 12 '13 at 4:05

Use Enumerable#count with a block.

[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10].count { |val| val <= 6 }
[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10].count { |val| val == 7 || val == 8 }
[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10].count { |val| val > 8 }
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Loop through three times ?? –  0v3rc10ck3d Oct 12 '13 at 3:54
    
@0v3rc10ck3d There is more than one way to do it. –  squiguy Oct 12 '13 at 3:55
    
of course more than one way. Wouldn't the fastest/ most efficient be the most interesting way ;) –  0v3rc10ck3d Oct 12 '13 at 3:56

How about this:

>> hash = Hash.new(0)
>> arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
>> arr.each { |e| hash[(e-7.5).truncate<=>0]+=1 }
>> hash
=> {-1=>6, 0=>2, 1=>2}

Or even more succinct:

>> arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
>> arr.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) { |e,h| h[(e-7.5).truncate<=>0]+=1 }
=> {-1=>6, 0=>2, 1=>2}
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1  
These posts are pretty eye opening....I'm new to ruby and seeing all of the many ways to get something done is incredible. –  Luigi Oct 12 '13 at 16:06
1  
Clever! And, of course, .values => [6,2,2]. You could also write the block as {|e,h| h[(e+1)/2-4<=>0]+=1}. –  Cary Swoveland Oct 13 '13 at 0:37
    
@CarySwoveland, I believe the order of .values is undefined. If an array is required, we should probably use .values_at(-1,0,1) to make it explicit, or .values_at(*-1..1) if we were being clever :-) –  staafl Oct 13 '13 at 10:51
    
nice use of integer division btw –  staafl Oct 13 '13 at 10:52
    
I believe we are OK with v1.9+, as now "Hashes enumerate their values in the order that the corresponding keys were inserted"). BTW, nice use of values_at. –  Cary Swoveland Oct 13 '13 at 14:01

More interesting, imo, is to answer @Luigi's three questions with a single statement (containing no semicolons). Here are two ways to do it:

a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

a.inject([0,0,0]) {|arr,i| [arr[0]+(i<7 ? 1:0), arr[1]+((i>6 and i<9) ? 1:0), arr[2]+(i>8 ? 1:0)]}
a.slice_before(7).to_a.map {|arr| arr.slice_before(9).to_a}.flatten(1).map(&:size)
    # => [6, 2, 2]

Edit: another, inspired by @staafl's answer:

arr.group_by {|e| (e+1)/2-4<=>0}.values.map(&:size)

Can you suggest others?

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