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I mentioned in one of my earlier questions that I'm reading book "C++ Coding Standards" By Herb Sutter and Andrei Alexandrescu. In one of the chapters they are saying something like this:

Always perform unmanaged resource acquisition, such as a new expression whose result is not immediately passed to a smart pointer constructor, in the constructor body and not in initializer lists.

Does that mean that I should use construction of this form (providing that data_3_ has to be initialized with new):

SomeClass(const T& value, const U& value2, const R& value3)
    : data_(value), data_2_(value2)
{
    data_3_ = new value3;
}

instead of:

SomeClass(const T& value, const U& value2, const R& value3)
    : data_(value), data_2_(value2), data_3_(new value3)
    // here data_3_ is initialized in ctor initialization list
    // as far as I understand that incorrect way according to authors
{
}

Thanks in advance.

P.S. And if that's what they mean why are they using term unmanaged resource acquisition? I always thought that this resources are "manually managed"?

P.S 2. I'm sorry in advance if there are any formatting problems in this post - I have to admit - I absolutely detest the way of formatting on this forum.

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4  
I haven't read the book, but don't they explain WHY they make this rule? –  anon Dec 19 '09 at 14:44
    
It looks like you're formatting manually instead of pasting and then using the Code Sample button (the one with the 1s and 0s). –  Amnon Dec 19 '09 at 14:44
    
Without having the book myself, it definitely sounds like you're interpreting the statement correctly. I think the better question is: can somebody explain why this should be accepted as a general rule? What difference does it make if you new something in the initializer list vs the constructor body? –  mrkj Dec 19 '09 at 14:48
    
Neil, no, not really. Theye give only refs to other book, and I assume that it is explained there, but I do not want to jump from book to book, and I don't have the other book at home so it is hard for me to check it anyway. –  There is nothing we can do Dec 19 '09 at 14:53
    
"unmanaged" is used on behalf of the compiler. Either the compiler manages the allocations (with RAII, i.e. on the stack, with smart pointers, etc.), or the user does it manually (using raw C-like pointers, and thus, is "unmanaged" by the compiler) –  paercebal Dec 20 '09 at 14:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's because the constructor of SomeClass may throw an exception.

In the situation you describe (ie not using a smart pointer), you have to free the resource in the destructor AND if the constructor of SomeClass throws an exceptions, with a try-catch block:

SomeClass(const T& value, const U& value2, const R& value3):data_(value),data_2_(value2) :
data_3_(NULL)
{
    try 
    {
        data_3_ = new value3;

        // more code here that may throw an exception
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        delete data_3_;
        throw;
    }
}

.. Which you can't do if an exception is thrown in the initialisation list.

See this for further explanations.

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10  
Sorry, this isn't true. If the constructor of value3 throws, then the memory allocated by new will be deallocated - see 5.3.4/17 in the C++ DStandard. And even if that was the case, new would not return and data_3_ will not be assigned to, meaning that it cannot be deleted. –  anon Dec 19 '09 at 15:12
1  
who said it's about constructor of value3 throwing? Neil you're blaming people too fast imho –  Gregory Pakosz Dec 19 '09 at 15:19
3  
@Gregory The only other thing that could throw is new, in which case you still can't delete anything. –  anon Dec 19 '09 at 15:21
4  
Neil is right: Read the C++ standard at 5.3.4/17: google.com.au/… –  Brock Woolf Dec 19 '09 at 15:31
3  
@atch: This answer describes deleting an object if its own allocation fails, which is wrong. My answer describes deleting an already allocated object if something fails later on in the constructor. –  Mike Seymour Dec 19 '09 at 16:23

The advice is necessary if the class contains two or more unmanaged resources. If allocation of one fails, then you will need to free all the previous allocated resources to avoid a leak. (EDIT: more generally, any exception thrown after allocating a resource has to be handled by deleting that resource). This can't be done if they are allocated in the initialiser list. For example:

SomeClass() : data1(new value1), data2(new value2) {}

will leak the value1 if new value2 throws. You will need to handle this, like so:

SomeClass() : data1(0), data2(0)
{
    data1 = new value1; // could be in the initialiser list if you want
    try
    {
        data2 = new value2;
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        delete data1;
        throw;
    }
}

Of course, all these shenanigans can be avoided by sensible use of smart pointers.

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2  
I suspect this is the correct answer +1 –  anon Dec 19 '09 at 15:39
    
+1. This IS the correct answer. It has an hidden trap, though: The data in the initializer list is constructed according to the order of declaration of the members in the class declaration, not the order of the initializer list. Whereas, when the allocation is done inside the constructor, the user have control on the order of initialization. Still, the right solution for the main problem is using smart pointers, but then, I guess everyone knew that... –  paercebal Dec 20 '09 at 14:35
    
+1 As pointed out already, this REALLY IS the correct answer. :-D It has bit me a couple of times before with out of memory exceptions leading to resource leaks. All the more reason to use smart pointers. –  stinky472 Jun 25 '10 at 13:26

Initialization of manually managed resources may lead to resource leaks if the constructor throws an exception at any stage.

First, consider this code with automatically managed resources:

class Breakfast {
public:
    Breakfast()
        : spam(new Spam)
        , sausage(new Sausage)
        , eggs(new Eggs)
    {}

    ~Breakfast() {}
private:
    // Automatically managed resources.
    boost::shared_ptr<Spam> spam;
    boost::shared_ptr<Sausage> sausage;
    boost::shared_ptr<Eggs> eggs;
};

If "new Eggs" throws, ~Breakfast is not called, but all constructed members' destructors are called in reverse order, that is destructors of sausage and spam.

All resources are properly released, no problem here.

If you use raw pointers (manually managed):

class Breakfast {
public:
    Breakfast()
        : spam(new Spam)
        , sausage(new Sausage)
        , eggs(new Eggs)
    {}

    ~Breakfast() {
        delete eggs;
        delete sausage;
        delete spam;
    }
private:
    // Manually managed resources.
    Spam *spam;
    Sausage *sausage;
    Eggs *eggs;
};

If "new Eggs" throws, remember, ~Breakfast is not called, but rather the destructors of spam and sausage (which are nothing in this cause, because we have raw pointers as actual objects).

Therefore you have a leak.

The proper way of rewriting the code above is this:

class Breakfast {
public:
    Breakfast()
        : spam(NULL)
        , sausage(NULL)
        , eggs(NULL)
    {
        try {
            spam = new Spam;
            sausage = new Sausage;
            eggs = new Eggs;
        } catch (...) {
            Cleanup();
            throw;
        }
    }

    ~Breakfast() {
        Cleanup();
    }
private:
    void Cleanup() {
        // OK to delete NULL pointers.
        delete eggs;
        delete sausage;
        delete spam;
    }

    // Manually managed resources.
    Spam *spam;
    Sausage *sausage;
    Eggs *eggs;
};

Of course, you should instead prefer to wrap every unmanaged resource in a separate RAII class, so you can manage them automatically and group them together into other classes.

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I'm posting this as an answer because it is too long to fit into a comment.

Consider:

A * a;
...
a = new A;

What happens if A's constructor throws?

  • firstly, the A instance being constructed is never fully created
  • that being the case, A's destructor will not be called - there is in fact no A object
  • the memory allocated by new to build the A in is deallocated
  • stack unwinding takes place, this means that the assignment to the pointer 'a' never takes place, it retains its original indeterminate value.

From this it should be obvious that there is nothing to call delete on, no allocated memory, no object of type A. The same logic holds if new throws, except the A constructor will never have been used in the first place.

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It's a matter of exception safety.

If for some reason, the constructor fails and throws an exception, you can't clean up behind you.

Let's consider:

SomeClass() : data1(new T1()), data2(new T2()), data3(new T3()) {}

If T2's or T3s constructor throws, you definitely leak the memory corresponding to the initialization of data1. Also, you won't know which allocation raised the exception: was it new T2() or new T3()? and it's such a case you don't know whether it's safe to delete data2; as part of a constructor exception handler.

To write exception safe code, use smart pointers or use try/catch blocks in the body of the constructor.

SomeClass() : data1(new T1()), data2(new T2()), data3(new T3())
{
  data1 = new T1();
  try
  {
    data2 = new T2();
    try
    {
      data3 = new T3();
    }
    catch (std::exception&)
    {
      delete data2;
      throw;
    }
  }
  catch (std::exception&)
  {
    delete data1;
    throw;
  }
}

As you can see, using try/catch blocks is not that readable and likely error prone, compared to using member smart pointers.

Note: "C++ Coding Standards" Chapter 48 refers to "More Exceptional C++" Item 18 which itself refers to Stroustrup's "The Design And Evolution of C++3" Section 16.5 and Stroustrup's "The C++ Programming Language" Section 14.4.

EDIT: "More Exceptional C++ Item 18 has the same content as GotW #66: Constructor Failures. Refer to the web page in case you don't have the book.

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See my comment to Sam's answer. –  anon Dec 19 '09 at 15:13
    
well the discussion would be easier with a better sample code. See the "Aside: Why Does C++ Do It That Way?" section in gotw.ca/gotw/066.htm –  Gregory Pakosz Dec 19 '09 at 15:17
    
that's the link i've pointed to in my answer. Neil needs to understand what happens if a constructor fails in a try-catch block. That's explained in a few FAQs I guess, see Marshall Cline's FAQ, it should be there somewhere. @Neil you misunderstand the standard. –  Keats Dec 19 '09 at 15:29

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