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The thing: I have a page, which has to display undetermined number of images, loaded through AJAX (using base64 encoding on the server-side) one by one.

var position = 'front';
while(GLOB_PROCEED_FETCH)
{
    getImageRequest(position);
}

function getImageRequest(position)
{
    GLOB_IMG_CURR++;
$.ajax({
        url: urlAJAX + 'scan=' + position,
        method: 'GET',
        async: false,
        success: function(data) {
            if ((data.status == 'empty') || (GLOB_IMG_CURR > GLOB_IMG_MAX))
            {
                GLOB_PROCEED_FETCH = false;
                return true;
            }
            else if (data.status == 'success')
            {
                renderImageData(data);
            }
        }
    });
}

The problem is that images (constructed with the renderImageData() function) are appended (all together) to the certain DIV only when all images are fetched. I mean, there is no any DOM manipulation possible until the loop is over.

I need to load and display images one by one because of possible huge number of images, so I can't stack them until they all will be fetched.

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You're starting a request in the while loop and this request starts another request if data.status == 'success' and no request when you're setting GLOB_PROCEED_FETCH = false which is the condition of the while loop. So what is the reason for the while loop at all? –  Andreas Oct 12 '13 at 8:24
    
Fixed the initial code –  AlexShumilov Oct 12 '13 at 8:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try using setInterval() function instead of while().

var fetch = setInterval(loadImage, 2000);

function loadImage(){
    position= new position; //Change variable position here.
    getImageRequest(position);
    if(!GLOB_PROCEED_FETCH){
          clearInterval(fetch);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
How does this ever stop? It will go on forever. It doesn't observe any of the stop conditions the OP's code has. Also, if you use async ajax (which doesn't lock up the browser), there is no reason to use a timer either. –  jfriend00 Oct 12 '13 at 8:40
    
@jfriend00 Nice observation. Using the clearInterval, as added now. Thank you. –  Optimus Prime Oct 12 '13 at 8:50
    
Thank you! It works, but somehow it still renders images strangely - it renders them by sets of two or three images. I mean in the very beginning ALL of the images were rendered in the very end, now they are rendered by sets of random number. –  AlexShumilov Oct 12 '13 at 9:02
    
Increasing your interval may provide your browser more time to breathe. But I don't think, rendering them by sets of random number would be any problem, its fine right? –  Optimus Prime Oct 12 '13 at 9:05
    
Thank you again! Actually yeah, as far as it won't cause any problem with logic –  AlexShumilov Oct 12 '13 at 9:14

Your best bet would be to restructure your code to use async ajax calls and launch the next call when the first one completes and so on. This will allow the page to redisplay between image fetches.

This will also give the browser a chance to breathe and take care of its other housekeeping and not think that maybe it's locked up or hung.

And, use async: 'false' is a bad idea. I see no reason why properly structured code couldn't use asynchronous ajax calls here and not hang the browser while you're fetching this data.

You could do it with asynchronous ajax like this:

function getAllImages(position, maxImages) {
    var imgCount = 0;

    function getNextImage() {
        $.ajax({
            url: urlAJAX + 'scan=' + position,
            method: 'GET',
            async: true,
            success: function(data) {
                if (data.status == "success" && imgCount <= maxImages) {
                    ++imgCount;
                    renderImageData(data);
                    getNextImage();
                }
            }
        });
    }
    getNextImage();
}

// no while loop is needed
// just call getAllImages() and pass it the 
// position and the maxImages you want to retrieve
getAllImages('front', 20);

Also, while this may look like recursion, it isn't really recursion because of the async nature of the ajax call. getNextImage() has actually completed before the next one is called so it isn't technically recursion.

share|improve this answer
    
while(GLOB_PROCEED_FETCH) { setTimeout(getImageRequest(position), 1); } - you mean to do requests in loop without recursive call in "success" handler? –  AlexShumilov Oct 12 '13 at 8:20
    
@AlexShumilov - I added a code example using async AJAX which is much better. –  jfriend00 Oct 12 '13 at 8:24
    
I cannot set the "async: true", because number of desired AJAX calls is undetermined - if I set "async: true", it produces huge number of AJAX calls in the beginning, while GLOB_PROCEED_FETCH is not set. –  AlexShumilov Oct 12 '13 at 8:24
    
@AlexShumilov - please look at my code example. It doesn't use the while loop. It launches the next ajax call when the previous one succeeds and stops when it hits the max images or doesn't get success. It can work with async: true. –  jfriend00 Oct 12 '13 at 8:26
    
Thanks you very much! There is still a problem - we cannot set the limit of calls - GLOB_IMG_MAX is extreme value, it will be hardly ever reached. If we set the flag, GLOB_PROCEED_FETCH, it won't be working properly - when server will respond "No images left", we will have a lot of AJAX calls already made. –  AlexShumilov Oct 12 '13 at 8:35

Wrong and wrong. Don't user timers, don't chain them. Look at jQuery Deferred / when, it has everything you need.

var imgara = [];
for (image in imglist) {
  imgara[] = ajax call
}
$.when.apply($, imgara).done(function() {
  // do something
}).fail(function() {
  // do something else
});
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