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I am experimenting with the Twitter API and I'm finding a bit confusing that my code works with only some the functions listed in the API documentacion https://dev.twitter.com/docs/api/1.1

For example:

I can succesfully get the list of available places with this code:

from twitter import *
from datetime import datetime

OAUTH_TOKEN = 'my token'
OAUTH_SECRET = 'my secret token'
CONSUMER_KEY = 'my key'
CONSUMER_SECRET ='my secret key'

t = Twitter( auth=OAuth(OAUTH_TOKEN, OAUTH_SECRET,
        CONSUMER_KEY, CONSUMER_SECRET) )

trends1 = t.trends.available()
print trends1

However, if I use the place() function, instead of available() it doesn't work:

from twitter import *
from datetime import datetime

OAUTH_TOKEN = 'my token'
OAUTH_SECRET = 'my secret token'
CONSUMER_KEY = 'my key'
CONSUMER_SECRET ='my secret key'

t = Twitter( auth=OAuth(OAUTH_TOKEN, OAUTH_SECRET,
        CONSUMER_KEY, CONSUMER_SECRET) )

trends1 = t.trends.place(1)
print trends1

The code is the same except that I am using place() instead of available().

Does anybody know what the problem is?

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What exact library is this? There is, I believe, more than one Python Twitter library that is imported as import twitter. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '13 at 8:52
    
I suspect you are using this package as the signature of Twitter() matches. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '13 at 8:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to use keyword arguments when calling:

trends1 = t.trends.place(_id=1)

The twitter.TwitterCall() object that proxies the API request does not know how to translate positional arguments to URL parameters; it carries no mapping from argument at position 0 to parameter id in the query.

The id keyword, however, is special; the twitter library assumes that to be part of the URL; _id should be used when the API call requires a id=.. query parameter instead.

The PyPI page doesn't render the readme very well; you may want to refer to the GitHub project page instead as the examples are more readable there. That page gives, among others, the following example:

# to pass in the GET/POST parameter `id` you need to use `_id`
t.statuses.oembed(_id=1234567890)

For completeness sake, the counter example is when to use id; the API URL geo/id/:place_id becomes:

t.geo.id(id='df51dec6f4ee2b2c')  # pass in `id` to extend the URL
t.geo.id.df51dec6f4ee2b2c()      # build the URL as an attribute instead

Yes, that's two forms that both work, but not all valid id values are valid Python attribute names.

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