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I'm trying out an example on Arduino: http://playground.arduino.cc/Interfacing/Python

The example (running on Ubuntu) works great in the shell:

import serial

ser = serial.Serial('/dev/ttyACM0', 9600)

while True:
    print(ser.readline())

However attempting to execute as a script:

Desktop/python_arduino/./serial.py...

Which executes this:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import serial

ser = serial.Serial('/dev/ttyACM0', 9600)

while True:
    print(ser.readline())

And I get this:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "Desktop/python_arduino/./serial.py", line 2, in <module>
    import serial
  File "/home/leo/Desktop/python_arduino/serial.py", line 4, in <module>
    ser = serial.Serial('/dev/ttyACM0', 9600)
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'Serial'

What is causing this inconsistency? It should be easy to import serial regardless of shell or script right?

share|improve this question
    
What was causing the behaviour you observed? – Udo Klein Oct 13 '13 at 10:07
    
See my answer below. The script filename was the same name as the import. So the filename was serial.py. The module is called serial. I changed the script's filename, and it worked. – Orangeman555 Oct 14 '13 at 20:18
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I FOUND IT!

The issue was actually subtle yet simple.

The script filename was the same name as the import.

So the filename was serial.py. The module is called serial, so it created a conflict.

I changed the script's filename, and it worked.

share|improve this answer
    
I had to delete the .pyc file as well. – user3430761 Aug 13 '15 at 19:37

The difference between the shell and your script may be different path setups. Compare the paths and see if anything differs for the script vs. the shell

import ser
print ser.__file__

import sys
print sys.executable
share|improve this answer

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