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I am trying to build a program where I wanted to create an object that is part of two classes.

I have the class Student and then I have a class for Node. And I want to create an object that is at the same time a Student and a Node. I tried doing this:

            Student James; 
            James = new Node; 

But that doesn't work. Any help on how to do this? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
That isn't possible.How is Node related to Student ? May be depending on the relationship, you can go for Inheritance or create an instance variable of type Node inside Student. –  Shashank Kadne Oct 12 '13 at 13:03
    
Although a Node could contain a student, are you sure a Node IS a student? –  Neil Kirk Oct 12 '13 at 13:39

3 Answers 3

Use inheritance: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inheritance_%28computer_science%29

class Node {
  //....
}

class Student : public Node {
  //....
}

Student James;

You can treat object James as Node via pointer to base object:

Node * p = &James;
share|improve this answer

What you're looking for is multiple inheritance:

class MyClass : public Student, public Node
{
    // ...
};

MyClass James;

You may want to read up on this feature of C++, it's not without its pitfalls.

EDIT

The question here is: what is the relation between Student and Node?


If Student is a kind of Node (e.g. you have students, teachers, etc and you all want these to behave as nodes), then you can simply inherit Student from Node:

class Student : public Node
{
    // ...
};

Student James;

In this case, you can also do:

Node* James = new Student();
// do stuff with James
delete James;

If Student and Node are independent, you have to ask yourself if you really want an object that can behave as both at the same time. Perhaps you only need an object that pairs a Student and a Node:

struct MyStruct
{
    Student myStudent;
    Node myNode;
};

MyStruct James;

If you actually need an object that can behave as both Student and Node (even though those two things are independent) then you'll need multiple inheritance.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not downvoter but multiple inheritance is redundant in this case. –  kotlomoy Oct 12 '13 at 13:26
    
Well, possibly. The question doesn't explicitly state (or even hint) that Student is a subclass of Node. I'll edit the answer. –  suszterpatt Oct 12 '13 at 13:28

Use polymorphism:

Class Base
{
}

class Student : public Base
{
}

class Node : public Base
{
}

Now:

Student s;
Node n;

Base* b = &s;
b = &n;
share|improve this answer
    
So where's the object that is a Student and a Node at the sme time? –  suszterpatt Oct 12 '13 at 13:13
    
@suszterpatt : first, question is somehow ambiguous. second, now b is Student and Node at the same time. it is then the OP that must declare same methods and properties of Student and Node in the Base class. So to answer your question, obviously b is both a student and a node. –  MohammadRB Oct 12 '13 at 13:26
1  
@MohammadRB Obviosly Student and Node are different classes here. They share some properties of Base which are not related to Node or Student. Otherwise there's no relation between Node and Student. –  kotlomoy Oct 12 '13 at 13:31
    
@kotlomoy I don't know what are student and node. i only want give a hint to OP, that what he can do. i believe if OP see my answer along other answers and search for inheritance, he can solve his problem himself –  MohammadRB Oct 12 '13 at 15:38

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