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Say I have a module test.py:

def foo():
   print "foo"

def bar():
   print "bar"

def _baz():
   print "_baz"

__all__ = ['foo']

and a main.py:

from test import foo, bar, _baz

foo()
bar()   # breaks module privacy
_baz()  # breaks module privacy

Is there any (static) code analyzer tool for Python that will catch the imports breaking the privacy (bar, _baz) hinted by __all__?

I have tested Pylint, but it does not catch either.

Another clarification: I am not talking about situation where __all__ would be dynamically modified/filled and/or where importing code is dynamic. Just statically analyzable code situations.

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1  
Python doesn't have privacy. __all__ is a hint to limit what is imported by from module import * and what help() reports. That is the limit of it's usefulness. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '13 at 13:05
    
Well, thats obvious, but not my question. –  oberstet Oct 12 '13 at 13:06
    
As such, there are no existing tools that will flag this. You'd also have to flag import test; test._baz, etc. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '13 at 13:07
    
Sure, those imports also "violate" the __all__ hint. It's just an example. –  oberstet Oct 12 '13 at 13:09
    
What I mean is: because __all__'s intention has nothing to do with privacy (it is not a limit on what is exported, it is a tool to delimit wildcard importing) no tool in the Python ecosystem exists that takes that interpretation and tracks usage of names that are not listed in __all__. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '13 at 13:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because __all__'s intention has nothing to do with privacy (it is not a limit on what is exported, it is a tool to delimit wildcard importing) no tool in the Python ecosystem exists that takes that interpretation and tracks usage of names that are not listed in __all__.

In other words; __all__ was never intended as a means to bless only parts of the exported names as public, just as _name leading underscores are just private by convention and not enforced.

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I guess I need to write a static code analyzer capable of checking _name == private convention myself? Well;) –  oberstet Oct 12 '13 at 13:55
    
Indeed; study the source code of existing analyzers (pyflakes, etc.) to see how they do it. AST analysis isn't that hard. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '13 at 13:57

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