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I want to use some code similar to what follows that actually works:

P = 20
n = 1
for x in range(1, P+1):
    Ax = n #Hoping that you can name the variable from the current element in the range
    n = n+1

I want to make varibles A1, A2, A3....A20 they would have the values 1, 2, 3...20 in this example...

Is this possible at all, and what coding does it require?

Cheers

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marked as duplicate by Marcin Aug 15 at 16:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5  
You really do not want to do this. Use a list instead. Keep your data out of your variable names. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 12 '13 at 13:42
4  
I've rolled back your question to the original as changing your question to another question, then suddenly to a "never mind - think it does work" doesn't help others make sense of your question and the answers given. If you have further questions, please ask it as a new question. Also, please consider accepting one of the answers given if it's helped you solve your question. –  Jon Clements Oct 12 '13 at 14:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't actually want to do this. Instead, you want something like this:

P = 20
n = 1
A = []        # Or `A = list()`
for x in range(1, P+1):
    A.append(n)
    n += 1

Then, instead of A0, you do A[0] and instead of A5 you do A[5].

Here is the Python 3.x list documentation (I presume you are using Python 3.x due to using range rather than xrange.

Also, as I understand it, your code could just be this:

P = 20
A = []
for x in range(1, P+1):
    A.append(x)

Or this:

P = 20
A = [i for i in range(1, P+1)]

(See the documentation for list comprehensions, a very useful feature of Python.)

Or even:

P = 20
A = list(range(1, P+1))
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Do not try to dynamically name variables. That way madness lies.

Instead, leverage python's data structures to do what you want. In most cases, people really want to be using a dict or a list.

a = {} 

for x in range(1,21):
    a[x] = x**2


b = []

for x in range(1,21):
    b.append(x**2)

You will get a feel for when you want to use one over the other. For example, in the above if I needed to quickly look up the square of a given integer, I would use a dict. If I instead just needed to do something to the collection of squares between 1 and 20, that's when I use a list.

Trivial example, but this scales up as far as you need it to. Any hashable data type can be a key in a dictionary, so you're no longer restricted from naming your variables with clunky letters and numbers - any object will do!

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I almost agree with all the answers and comments you got so far: 99.99% of the times, you don't want to do this. It's dangerous, ugly and bad.

However there is a way to do it, using exec:

P = 20
n = 1
for x in range(1, P+1):
    exec("A{} = n".format(x))
    n = n+1

Again, you probably shouldn't use this.

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