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Here is the code:

def Class(clas12):
inputData = ''.join(clas12.readlines())
line=inputData.split('\n')
line2=[]
for a in line:
    b=a.split(' ')
    line2.append(b)
return line2

clas12=open('class12.txt','r')

Class12=Class(clas12)
Class13=list(Class12)

When I alter Class12( such by .remove, .append), the same change will be applied to Class13. This is frustrating because I need the original list for another function. Is there a way to keep the original list or copy it so that it won't be altered?

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1  
Google deep cloning vs shallow cloning. What you are doing is called shallow copying. – Jarrod Roberson Oct 12 '13 at 15:13
    
Thanks! it solved my problem :) – user2874264 Oct 12 '13 at 15:25
up vote 0 down vote accepted

By default python uses references rather than copies, it is faster an more memory efficient that way - if you need a copy that you can alter without changing the original:

import copy

def Class(clas12):
inputData = ''.join(clas12.readlines())
line=inputData.split('\n')
line2=[]
for a in line:
    b=a.split(' ')
    line2.append(b)
return line2

clas12=open('class12.txt','r')

Class12=Class(clas12)
Class13=copy.deepcopy(Class12)
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