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Consider the following, where some content is added to a vector through multiple layers:

class A {
public:
  void Add(Content c) {
    // Considerable amount of checking code here.
    v.push_back(c);
  }
private:
  std::vector<Content> v;
};

class B {
public:
  void Add(Content c) {
    // Considerable amount of additional code here.
    a.Add(c);
  }
private:
  A a;
};

class C {
public:
  void Add(Content c) {
    // Considerable amount of additional code here.
    b.Add(c);
  }
private:
  B b;
};

This can be continued but you see the point here. I want the content to be added either through copy or move, i.e. either via push_back(const Content&) or push_back(Content&&). The caller should be able to either call:

C c;
Content z;
c.Add(z);

or

c.Add(move(z));

and get a minimal number of copies.

Is there a way to achieve this without duplication of the additional code and without making the Add functions template functions?

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2 Answers 2

You can add two methods with next signatures :

void Add(Content && c);
void Add(Content & c);

Other option is universal reference, but you need templates for that.

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Wouldn't that require code duplication (see question)? –  Kit Fisto Oct 12 '13 at 16:06

Overloading two methods for rvalue and lvalue is an approach:

void Add(const Content & c);
void Add(Content && c);

Using perfect forwarding you can avoid two overloads. You should make all add methods like this:

template<typename T>
void add(T&& a)
{
   b.Add(std::forward<T>(a));
}

 

Another approach which is better (IMO) is making Content movable. If Content is real class (not a placeholder for templates), you can do it:

class Content
{
public:
  Content(const Content &);
  Content(Content &&);

  Content &operator=(Content);  // Copy and swap idiom!

  ~Content();
};

After that you can re-write Add methods like below:

 void Add(Content c) {
    b.Add(std::move(c));
          ^^^^^^^^^^^^
 }

The advantage of this approach is, you can transparent the moving or copying from caller side.

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If I have n layers. Would I use call-by-value in all the Add methods? Or just in the outermost and the other would all be rvalue parameters? If first option: Can I be sure that all copies will be elided by the compiler? –  Kit Fisto Oct 12 '13 at 16:26
    
The first solution would lead to code duplication, wouldn't it? The Add functions contain much more code than just the inner Add call. –  Kit Fisto Oct 12 '13 at 16:29
    
@KitFisto: For the first solution, by perfect forwarding you can avoid code duplication. Why don't you make the Content movable to get rid of the duplication? –  deepmax Oct 12 '13 at 16:36
    
@KitFisto: (to your first comment). If you pick first solution, you should write && overloads for all layers. If you pick second, you don't need them and passing by value is fine. –  deepmax Oct 12 '13 at 16:38
    
@M.M: I like the second solution but want to understand also the first one. How can I avoid to duplicate the checking code within Add function if I need two overloads? Perfect forwarding would require me to convert them into template functions wouldn't it? –  Kit Fisto Oct 12 '13 at 16:39

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