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def mkEntry(file1):
    for line in file1:
        print(line.rstrip().split(','))

def main():
    openFile = 'yob' + input("Enter the year <Do NOT include 'yob' or .'txt' : ") + '.txt'
    file1 = open(openFile)
    mkEntry(file1)

When I load the text file. It came out to be this:

['Emma,F,20791\n']
names goes on...

instead of this:

['Emma','F','20791']
names goes on...

The file contains, Emma,F,20791 and the next line is new name/numbers/gender. How do I make the python to read the file and prints the list correctly for me? Thanks.

File Content:

Emma,F,20791
Tom,M,1658
Anthony,M,985
Lisa,F,88976
Ben,M,6989
Shelly,F,8975
share|improve this question
1  
Please post the file's content. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 12 '13 at 17:21
1  
Aside: your variable names aren't great. openFile is a file name, textFileName is a file object, currentFile is a string line, etc. –  DSM Oct 12 '13 at 17:22
    
@hcwhsa added the file content. –  user1552400 Oct 12 '13 at 17:22
1  
You have got some serious naming issues going on. Why is textFileName not a text file name but a file object? Why is openFile not an open file but the name of a file? Why is currentFile a line from a file rather than a file object? That's just going to confuse you. –  kindall Oct 12 '13 at 17:25
1  
@user1552400 With that content I can't reproduce the same output, output is ['Emma', 'F', '20791\n']. So, split is working fine and to take care of '\n' use currentFile.rstrip().split(","). –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 12 '13 at 17:25

1 Answer 1

textFileName only a file object. You have to read the content using functions read or readline.

This is how your code should be:

file1 = open(openFile)
lines = file1.readlines()      #This produces a list of lines in your file.
for line in lines:
     words = line.strip().split(",")         #This produces a list of words in the line.
     print words

Another way of doing it is using with.

with open(openFile) as file1:
    lines = file1.readlines()      #This produces a list of lines in your file.
    for line in lines:
        words = line.strip().split(",")         #This produces a list of words in the line.
        print words
share|improve this answer
1  
file.readline doesn't produce a list of lines. And there's no need of loading all the lines into memory, simply iterate over the file object. Lastly your code will not solve OP's problem. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 12 '13 at 17:32
    
Thanks for pointing out. It should be readlines. –  Vamsi Krishna Oct 12 '13 at 17:34
    
I'm not sure why this wouldn't solve his problem. This might not be the most efficient code, as you have pointed out, but this gives the expected result. –  Vamsi Krishna Oct 12 '13 at 17:43
    
Because there was no strip in your original code. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 12 '13 at 17:44
1  
This answer still says that you need to call .readlines(), which as @hcwhsa pointed out you don't need to. As well, the OP's code couldn't have produced the output that the OP said it did, which confused things. –  DSM Oct 12 '13 at 17:55

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