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When declaring an enum inside a class in java I've seen these 2 approaches:

1)

public class MyClass {

    private enum MyEnum {
        A, B, C;
    }

    /* Static fields */

    /* Instance variables */

    /* Methods */
}

2)

public class MyClass {

    /* Static fields */

    /* Instance variables */

    /* Methods */

    private enum MyEnum {
        A, B, C;
    }
}

Which one is the most used? Is there any convention for this?

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Is there any problem if you place it differently? –  Rupesh Oct 12 '13 at 19:13
    
@Rupesh I just want to know if there is a convention for this or if it's a matter of personal preference. –  miviclin Oct 12 '13 at 19:19
    
no not at all and to be on safer side not that I know of. Refer my answer below –  Rupesh Oct 12 '13 at 19:20
    
I would prefer the first one –  Mustafa Genç Oct 12 '13 at 19:21
    
I prefer to declare enum etc before I use them. –  Peter Lawrey Oct 12 '13 at 19:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Generally in Java, nested data types (e.g. classes, enums) go at the bottom of a file.

However, for short, private enums like the one you posted (which feel more like fields), I'd go with #1.

For longer enums, I'd either go with #2 or put them in a separate file.

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There isn't any convention used for it, but from what I've seen, example 1 is used more often. I personally place them in that way too.

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Java does not have a typedef statement (as in C and C++). To declare new types in Java, you declare a new class; then variables can be declared to be of that class's type. Also Java uses Forward references, java compiler is smarter than the C compiler, in that it allows methods to be invoked before they are defined. This eliminates the need to declare functions in a header file before defining them in a program file, as is done in C.

I can place my enum anywhere and can access it from anywhere. Refer example.

class CheckEnum{

    private void method1() {
        System.out.println(enumTest.test1);    
    }       
    private enum enumTest{
        test1
    }       
    private void method2() {
        System.out.println(enumTest.test1);
    }
}

I have checked and both method method1 and method2 has access to enumTest.

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