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What's the most efficient way to build a cache with arbitrary Ruby objects as keys that are expired based on a least recently used algorithm. It should use Ruby's normal hashing semantics (not equal?)

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Are you trying for minimal memory use or minimal cpu use, how often are you dropping stuff out of the LRU cache? You can either go the scavenger approach or a double linked list with a paired hash. –  Sam Saffron Dec 20 '09 at 11:24
    
for some ideas see: java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/LinkedHashMap.html also mongodb has capped collection similarly you can do this stuff with redis. assuming you are looking for a built in ruby solution though –  Sam Saffron Dec 20 '09 at 11:26

8 Answers 8

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This pushes the boundaries of my understanding of how Ruby uses memory, but I suspect that the most efficient implementation would be a doubly-linked list where every access moves the key to the front of the list, and every insert drops an item if the maximum size has been reached.

However, assuming Ruby's Hash class is already very efficient, I'd bet that the somewhat naive solution of simply adding age data to a Hash would be fairly good. Here's a quick toy example that does this:

class Cache
  attr_accessor :max_size

  def initialize(max_size = 4)
    @data = {}
    @max_size = max_size
  end

  def store(key, value)
    @data.store key, [0, value]
    age_keys
    prune
  end

  def read(key)
    if value = @data[key]
      renew(key)
      age_keys
    end
    value
  end

  private # -------------------------------

  def renew(key)
    @data[key][0] = 0
  end

  def delete_oldest
    m = @data.values.map{ |v| v[0] }.max
    @data.reject!{ |k,v| v[0] == m }
  end

  def age_keys
    @data.each{ |k,v| @data[k][0] += 1 }
  end

  def prune
    delete_oldest if @data.size > @max_size
  end
end

There's probably a faster way of finding the oldest item, and this is not thoroughly tested, but I'd be curious to know how anyone thinks this compares to a more sophisticated design, linked list or otherwise.

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I know its a few years late, but I just implemented what I believe is the fastest LRU Cache out there for Ruby.

It is also tested and optionally safe to use in multi threaded environments.

https://github.com/SamSaffron/lru_redux


Note: in Ruby 1.9 Hash is ordered, so you can cheat and build the fastest LRU cache in a few lines of code

class LruRedux::Cache19

  def initialize(max_size)
    @max_size = max_size
    @data = {}
  end

  def max_size=(size)
    raise ArgumentError.new(:max_size) if @max_size < 1
    @max_size = size
    if @max_size < @data.size
      @data.keys[0..@max_size-@data.size].each do |k|
        @data.delete(k)
      end
    end
  end

  def [](key)
    found = true
    value = @data.delete(key){ found = false }
    if found
      @data[key] = value
    else
      nil
    end
  end

  def []=(key,val)
    @data.delete(key)
    @data[key] = val
    if @data.length > @max_size
      @data.delete(@data.first[0])
    end
    val
  end

  def each
    @data.reverse.each do |pair|
      yield pair
    end
  end

  # used further up the chain, non thread safe each
  alias_method :each_unsafe, :each

  def to_a
    @data.to_a.reverse
  end

  def delete(k)
    @data.delete(k)
  end

  def clear
    @data.clear
  end

  def count
    @data.count
  end

  # for cache validation only, ensures all is sound
  def valid?
    true
  end
end
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Remaze has a reasonably well tested LRU Cache: See http://github.com/manveru/ramaze/blob/master/lib/ramaze/snippets/ramaze/lru_hash.rb

And there is also the hashery gem by rubyworks which should be more efficient than the remaze one for large caches.

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I threw together a new gem lrucache which you may find useful. It may be faster than Alex's approach for collections with a significant number of elements.

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Ruby Best Practices blog has a post about it.

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The rufus-lru gem is another option.

Instead of a count it just keeps a sorted array of keys from oldest to newest

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Very simple and fast lru cache I use in our http backend https://github.com/grosser/i18n-backend-http/blob/master/lib/i18n/backend/http/lru_cache.rb

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This link is now broken. –  Alex D Mar 12 '13 at 8:18
    
Thx, glad I already used it in a project :) –  grosser Mar 13 '13 at 14:04

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