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I was doing a bit of review on pointers in C and I was a bit confused by a bit of code I came across. I was doing a quiz on qeeksquiz.com/pointers to review, and I came across this piece of code:

#include<stdio.h> 
int main() 
{ 
   int a; 
   char *x; 
   x = (char *) &a; 
   a = 512; 
   x[0] = 1; 
   x[1] = 2; 
   printf("%d\n",a);   
   return 0; 
}

When I came across x = (char *) &a I got a bit confused. I understand that x is a pointer that holds the address of a, but when we assign x[0] = 1 and x[1] = 2; the answer, when printed, is 513. The answer talks about how it depends on what machine we are using, and how the little-endian machine changes how it reads a in binary. I am thoroughly confused on how we get from 512 to 513. I'm guessing it is because x[0] = 1 but I am not 100% sure. Can someone help explain this? If we assigned x[0] = 2, what would the value of a change to?

Thanks for the help!

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int is stored as a sequence of bytes. Here only 2 bytes are initialized: then value is calculated as x[0]+ 256*x[1] = 1 + 256*2 = 513. If it would be a different-endian machine, then (assuming int used 2 bytes, which is not always true) it would be other way round: x[1] + 256*x[0] = 2 + 256 = 258. – Ashalynd Oct 12 '13 at 20:13
    
Where are you getting the 256 from when you multiply x[1] by it? – user1871869 Oct 12 '13 at 20:21
    
256 is 2**8, and 8 is a number of bits in a byte. – Ashalynd Oct 12 '13 at 20:43
    
@user1871869: 256 comes from the base. Just as the base-10 number 12 means 1 * 10 + 2 * 1, and the base-16 number 0x12 means 1 * 16 + 2 * 1, the base-256 number (1, 2) means 1 * 256 + 2 * 1. – torek Oct 12 '13 at 20:45

as x is pointer to char, it means x[0] and x[1] is reference to single byte data, so in your memory you have data like this:

1 2

but, during output you trying to reference the same data as 16/32 bit, so we have not 2 single bytes, but 1 word, which is stored in memory as 0x01 0x02, for little endian it means that we should swap them, so we get number 0x201, which is 513 in decimal notation

for big endian it will be 0x102 which is 258 in decimal

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Doesn't it depend on the sizeof(int)? – LB-- Oct 12 '13 at 21:04
    
It will be 258 only for 16bit int. For 32bit int it will be 0x01020000 – kotlomoy Oct 12 '13 at 22:38
    
@kotlomoy you're right – Lashane Oct 13 '13 at 0:18

ASCII art!

                   Little endian              Big endian

               +----+----+----+----+     +----+----+----+----+
a = 0x200:     | 00 | 02 | 00 | 00 |     | 00 | 00 | 02 | 00 |
               +----+----+----+----+     +----+----+----+----+

               +----+----+----+----+     +----+----+----+----+
x[0] = 1:      | 01 | 02 | 00 | 00 |     | 01 | 00 | 02 | 00 |
               +----+----+----+----+     +----+----+----+----+

               +----+----+----+----+     +----+----+----+----+
x[1] = 2:      | 01 | 02 | 00 | 00 |     | 01 | 02 | 02 | 00 |
               +----+----+----+----+     +----+----+----+----+

result:          1x1 + 2x256 = 513     1x16777216 + 1x65536 + 2x256 + 0x1 = big
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An integer is made up of a sequence of bytes. But the order of the bytes is different in different systems. For example, consider the number 134480385 (binary = 00001000000001000000001000000001). On a little endian system, it is (with lowest address on the LEFT)

00000001 00000010 00000100 00001000

But on a big endian system, the bytes are stored the other way around. LEFT is still the lowest address.

00001000 00000100 00000010 00000001

When you take the address of the integer a and cast to a char (byte) pointer, it points to the first byte in the integer (the lowest address). When you write 1 to the pointer, the lowest byte is set to 00000001. However, char is only 1 byte long, so the other bytes are unchanged. Then the second byte is set to 00000010.

In your example, 512 in little endian is

00000000 00000010

Big endian is more tricky, because the result depends on how many bytes are in the int. It is commonly 4, but it could be 2 or more. As 2-byte int, 512 in memory is

00000010 00000000

and as a 4-byte int it is

00000000 00000000 00000010 00000000

(It doesn't matter for little endian, as the extra bytes are just zeros)

After writing 1 to the first byte and 2 to the second byte, you get in memory for a 4-byte little endian

00000001 00000010 00000000 00000000

a 4-byte big endian

00000001 00000010 00000010 00000000

Note the bits in the third byte are still there. This is because we only wrote to the first two bytes. The third and fourth bytes are unchanged.

and a 2-byte big endian

00000001 00000010

Interpreting the 2 or 4-byte memory (the extra zeros ignored for 2-byte) as little endian number as a normal binary number it is

00000000000000000000001000000001 = 513

Interpreting the 4-byte memory as big endian number as a normal binary number it is

00000001000000100000001000000000 = 16908800

Interpreting the 2-byte memory as big endian number as a normal binary number it is

0000000100000010 = 258

I may have made a mistake in my calculations but hopefully you get the idea. This is why you need to be careful when casting between different types of pointers.

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As others have pointed out, the trick is to understand how ints and chars are represented in memory. I've written some C++ code that tries to show you exactly that. Paste it into a file, compile & run; then change the values in main and see what happens. Here's the code:

#include <stdio.h>

// print one byte as a binary number
void print_binary(unsigned u) {
    for (int i = 7; i >= 0; --i)
        printf("%d", (u >> i) & 1);
}

// print a number's binary representation
template <typename T>
void print_int_binary(T i) {
    char *cp = (char*)&i;
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(T); ++i) {
        print_binary(cp[i]);
        printf(" ");
    }
    printf("\n");
}

// show how the variable is represented in memory
template <typename T>
void print_var_binary(const char *name, T t) {
    printf("%s is stored as %d bytes:\n", name, (int)sizeof(t));
    print_int_binary(t);
}

#define PRINT(a) print_var_binary(#a, a);

int main() {
    PRINT((int)513)
    PRINT((char)2)
}

When I run it on my (little-endian) computer, it prints:

(int)513 is stored as 4 bytes:
00000001 00000010 00000000 00000000 
(char)2 is stored as 1 bytes:
00000010 
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