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I have the following code and

#include <iostream>
#include <cuda.h>
#include <cuda_runtime.h>
#include <ctime>
#include <vector>
#include <numeric>

float random_float(void)
{
    return static_cast<float>(rand()) / RAND_MAX;
}

std::vector<float> add(float alpha, std::vector<float>& v1, std::vector<float>& v2 )

{  /*Do quick size check on vectors before proceeding*/

  std::vector<float> result(v1.size());
  for (unsigned int i = 0; i < result.size(); ++i)
  {
    result[i]=alpha*v1[i]+v2[i];
  }

  return result;

}

__global__ void Addloop( int N, float alpha, float* x, float* y ) {
   int i;
   int i0 = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;

   for( i = i0; i < N;  i += blockDim.x*gridDim.x ) 
      y[i] = alpha*x[i] + y[i];

   /*
   if ( i0 < N )
      y[i0] = alpha*x[i0] + y[i0];
    */
}

int main( int argc, char** argv ) {

    float alpha = 0.3;
    // create array of 256k elements
    int num_elements = 10;//1<<18;
    // generate random input on the host
    std::vector<float> h1_input(num_elements);
    std::vector<float> h2_input(num_elements);
    for(int i = 0; i < num_elements; ++i)
    {
        h1_input[i] = random_float();
        h2_input[i] = random_float();
    }
    for (std::vector<float>::iterator it = h1_input.begin() ; it != h1_input.end(); ++it)
        std::cout << ' ' << *it;
    std::cout << '\n';
    for (std::vector<float>::iterator it = h2_input.begin() ; it != h2_input.end(); ++it)
        std::cout << ' ' << *it;
    std::cout << '\n';

    std::vector<float> host_result;//(std::vector<float> h1_input, std::vector<float> h2_input );
    host_result = add( alpha, h1_input, h2_input );
    for (std::vector<float>::iterator it = host_result.begin() ; it != host_result.end(); ++it)
        std::cout << ' ' << *it;
    std::cout << '\n';

    // move input to device memory
    float *d1_input = 0;
    cudaMalloc((void**)&d1_input, sizeof(float) * num_elements);
    cudaMemcpy(d1_input, &h1_input[0], sizeof(float) * num_elements, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

    float *d2_input = 0;
    cudaMalloc((void**)&d2_input, sizeof(float) * num_elements);
    cudaMemcpy(d2_input, &h2_input[0], sizeof(float) * num_elements, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);


    Addloop<<<1,3>>>( num_elements, alpha, d1_input, d2_input );

    // copy the result back to the host
    std::vector<float> device_result(num_elements);
    cudaMemcpy(&device_result[0], d2_input, sizeof(float) * num_elements, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
    for (std::vector<float>::iterator it = device_result.begin() ; it != device_result.end(); ++it)
        std::cout << ' ' << *it;
    std::cout << '\n';


    cudaFree(d1_input);
    cudaFree(d2_input);
    h1_input.clear();
    h2_input.clear();
    device_result.clear();

    std::cout << "DONE! \n";
    getchar();

    return 0;
}

I am trying to understand the gpu memory access. The kernel, for reasons of simplicity, is launched as Addloop<<<1,3>>>. I am trying to understand how this code is working by imagining the for loops working on the gpu as instances. More specifically, I imagine the following instances but they do not help.

Instance 1:

for( i = 0; i < N; i += 3*1 ) // ( i += 0*1 --> i += 3*1 after Eric's comment) 
   y[i] = alpha*x[i] + y[i];

Instance 2:

for( i = 1; i < N; i += 3*1 ) 
   y[i] = alpha*x[i] + y[i];

Instance 3:

for( i = 3; i < N; i += 3*1 )
   y[i] = alpha*x[i] + y[i];

Looking inside of every loop it does not make any sense in the logic of adding two vectors. Can some one help?

The reason I am adopting this logic of instances is because it is working well in the case of the code inside the kernel which is in comments.

If these thoughts are correct what would be the instances in case we have multiple blocks inside the grid? In other words what would be the i values and the update rates (+=updaterate) in some examples?

PS: The kernel code borrowed from here.

UPDATE:

After Eric's answer I think the execution for N = 15, e.i the number of elements, goes like this (correct me if I am wrong):

For the instance 1 above i = 0 , 3, 6, 9, 12 which computes the corresponding y[i] values. For the instance 2 above i = 1 , 4, 7, 10, 13 which computes the corresponding remaining y[i] values. For the instance 3 above i = 2 , 5, 8, 11, 14 which computes the rest y[i] values.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your blockDim.x is 3 and gridDim.x is 1 according to your setup <<<1,3>>>. So in each thread (you call it instance), it should be i+=3*1

update

With the for loop you can compute 15 element using only 3 threads. Generally you can use limited number of threads to do "infinit" work. And more work per threads can improve the performance by reducing the launch overhead and hiding the instruction stalls.

Another advantage is you could use fixed number of threads/blocks to do work of various sizes, thus requires less tuning.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I get the point now. The question is why we should use a for loop and not something such that in the comments inside the kernel? I understand that it is doing part-based computations but is it more efficient? –  Darkmoor Oct 13 '13 at 9:05
    
for performance and convenience reason. –  Eric Oct 13 '13 at 9:24
    
Thanks Eric your update was enlightening. –  Darkmoor Oct 13 '13 at 9:29

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