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I am looking for a way to delete specific characters from within a string matching a regex pattern. I stored text with linebreaks in a tab-separated file supposed to have one record per line and I'm trying to replace all line breaks with spaces. Linebreaks do not occur in the last colum (which is a short column with an alphanumeric key).

The way to solve it IMHO is to replace every instance of \n within the following pattern:

[^\t]*\t[^\t]*

My solution until now uses three steps:

  1. replace the "good" \n with a special string absent from the rest of the text (e.g. long number) using s/\([^\t]*\t{x}[^\t]*\)\n/\1#12398754987235649876234#/g with x being one less than the intended number of columns in my files
  2. replace all the ("bad") \n with a space
  3. replace the long number with a new line

But I have quite a few gigabytes of text files and I'm looking for a way to do this in a single sed step.

Example input:

foo \t Each multiplex has screens allocated \n
to each studio. \t abc \n
bar \t The screens need filling. \t bcd \n
123 \t Studios have to create product to fill \n
their screen, and the amount of good product is limited. \t cde \n

Output:

foo \t Each multiplex has screens allocated to each studio. \t abc \n
bar \t The screens need filling. \t bcd \n
123 \t Studios have to create product to fill their screen, and the amount of good product is limited. \t cde \n
share|improve this question
    
Do lines literally start with a number? –  Bohemian Oct 12 '13 at 22:49
    
No. I modified my example to remove the ambiguity. There is NO pattern in the columns (can be text, numbers, punctuation...), except for the \t which is only used to separate columns. –  ATN Oct 12 '13 at 22:55
    
You are trying to remove any \n that does not follow ". ", is that right? –  Beta Oct 13 '13 at 0:40
    
No, as I wrote above, the content does not follow any pattern, except that there are no \t inside. –  ATN Oct 13 '13 at 0:43
    
Then I can't make sense of your example. Between two tabs you remove one line break, but not another. –  Beta Oct 13 '13 at 0:51

3 Answers 3

Using awk

cat file
foo     Each multiplex has screens allocated
to each studio.
bar     The screens need filling.
123     Studios have to create product to fill
their screen, and the amount of good product is limited.

If a line does contain tab \t then connect it to the next line.

awk 'NR>1 {s=/\t/?"\n":" "}{printf s"%s",$0} END {print ""}'
foo     Each multiplex has screens allocated to each studio.
bar     The screens need filling.
123     Studios have to create product to fill their screen, and the amount of good product is limited.
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r ':a;$!N;s/\n([^\t]+)$/\1/;ta;P;D' file

Read 2 lines into the pattern space (PS) and if the last line doesn't contain a tab, remove the newline and read in the next line and repeat. If the line does contain a tab, print the first line and then delete it and then repeat.

share|improve this answer

It's always tricky to handle previous lines with , because of its limitations of small number of buffers, non-greedy quantifiers, lack of look-ahead, and much more, but here you have an approach. It's commented but I know it's not easy to follow

sed -n '
    ## Label "a"
    :a;
    ## Enter this section after join all lines without a tab.
    /\t.*\t/ {
        ## Loop to remove all newlines but the last one, because it is
        ## next line with a tab that I dont want to print now.
        :b;
        /\n[^\n]*\n/ { 
            s/\n/ /; 
            bb 
        }; 
        ## Print until newline (all joined lines) and delete them
        P; 
        D;
    };
    ## Append next line to buffer and repeat loop.
    N; 
    $! ba;
    ## Special case for last line, remove extra newlines and print. 
    s/\n/ /g; 
    p
' infile

Assuming infile with following content:

foo     Each multiplex has screens allocated
to each studio.
bar     The screens need filling.
123     Studios have to create product to fill
their screen, and the amount of good product is limited.

It yields:

foo     Each multiplex has screens allocated to each studio.
bar     The screens need filling.
123     Studios have to create product to fill their screen, and the amount of good product is limited.
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