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In the code below, I use a decorator to perform changes on class variables

class MyClass():

    def __init__(self):
        self.vars = [1,2]
        self.log = None

    def _mydecorator(function):
        def logger(self):
            self.log = "BLA"
            function(self)
        return logger

    @_mydecorator
    def addone(self):
        print("Inside Class: %s" % map(lambda x: x+1, self.vars))
        return map(lambda x: x+1, self.vars)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    myclass = MyClass()
    print myclass.addone()

This script returns:

Inside Class: [2,3]
None

Why are the values not passed to the caller?

If I do not decorate the addone function I get:

Inside Class: [2,3]
[2,3]

What does this decorator change?

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Your logger is not returning the value of the wrapped function. You need to do return function(self). –  BrenBarn Oct 12 '13 at 23:08
2  
Aside: if you're experimenting with decorators, don't forget to look at functools.wraps, which lets decorated functions resemble the undecorated ones a little more. –  DSM Oct 12 '13 at 23:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You need to change your decorator to return the result of invoking the undecorated method:

def _mydecorator(function):
    def logger(self):
        self.log = "BLA"
        return function(self)
    return logger
share|improve this answer

Your logger function doesn't return the result of the function call. Change:

function(self)

To:

return function(self)
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