Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm working on an Assembly Language homework assignment and do not understand how to proceed for these questions. For the first one, I understand at some point I will need to give a directive of Align 2 to force myBytes into an even numbered address, but am unsure how to specifically write that instruction. For the others, I am unsure of how to move certain bytes of an identifier without moving all of them. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

.data
myBytes BYTE 10h,20h,30h,40h
myWords WORD 3 DUP(?),2000h
myString BYTE "ABCDE"
  1. Write a directive in the given data that aligns myBytes to an even-numbered address.

  2. Write a single instruction that moves the first two bytes in myBytes to the DX register. The resulting value will be 2010h.

  3. Write an instruction that moves the second byte in myWords to the AL register.

  4. Write an instruction that moves all four bytes in myBytes to the EAX register.

Here's what I've come up with so far:

1. ALIGN myBytes 2 ???   
2. mov dx, ?????   
3. mov al, [myWords+1]   
4. mov eax, [myBytes]
share|improve this question
2  
It's best to just ask your teacher if you have no idea where to start, that's not what stackoverflow is for. – Paul Griffiths Oct 13 '13 at 0:23
    
Well I've got a vague idea but I don't really know if I'm on the right track. 1. ALIGN myBytes 2 ??? 2. mov dx, ????? 3. mov al, [myWords+1] 4. mov eax, [myBytes] – sakau2007 Oct 13 '13 at 2:25
    
You haven't specified which assembler you're using. – Michael Oct 13 '13 at 11:04

Well I've got a vague idea but I don't really know if I'm on the right track.

Yep you're on the right track.

1. ALIGN myBytes 2 ???    <<-- correct   
2. mov dx, ?????         <-- what's difficult, you've got the rest correct.  
3. mov al, [myWords+1]   <-- correct
4. mov eax, [myBytes]    <-- correct

In order to unravel number 2, remember that the x86 is a little endian processor, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endianness

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.