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My code currently has the following 10 worker threads. Each worker thread continues polling a job from the queue and then process the long running job.

for (int k=0; k<10; k++)
{
  Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoPollingThenWork(), TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
}

void DoPollingThenWork()
{
  while (true)
  {
    var msg = Poll();
    if (msg != null)
    {
      Thread.Sleep(3000); // process the I/O bound job
    }
  }
}

I am refactoring the underlying code to use async/await pattern. I think I can rewrite the above code to the followings. It uses one main thread that keeps creating the async task, and use SemaphoreSlim to throttle the number of concurrent tasks to 10.

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => WorkerMainAsync(), TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);

async Task WorkerMainAsync()
{
  SemaphoreSlim ss = new SemaphoreSlim(10);
  while (true)
  {
    await ss.WaitAsync();
    Task.Run(async () => 
              {
                await DoPollingThenWorkAsync();
                ss.Release();
              });
  }
}

async Task DoPollingThenWorkAsync()
{
  var msg = Poll();
  if (msg != null)
  {
    await Task.Delay(3000); // process the I/O-bound job
  }
}

Both should behave the same. But I think the second options seems better because it doesn't block the thread. But the downside is I can't do Wait (to gracefully stop the task) since the task is like fire and forget. Is the second option the right way to replace the traditional worker threads pattern?

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1  
You should use Task.Run instead of Task.Factory.StartNew. One improvement this will get you is an automatic unwrapping of the inner task (thus, Wait will work as expected). –  Stephen Cleary Oct 13 '13 at 5:11
    
Yes, so in the sample the Task.Factory.StartNew is only used in the top-level caller to create a long-running background worker thread. –  Hengyi Oct 14 '13 at 2:41
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you have code that's asynchronous, you usually have no reason to use Task.Run() (or, even worse, Task.Factory.StartNew()). This means that you can change your code to something like this:

await WorkerMainAsync();

async Task WorkerMainAsync()
{
  SemaphoreSlim ss = new SemaphoreSlim(10);
  while (true)
  {
    await ss.WaitAsync();
    // you should probably store this task somewhere and then await it
    var task = DoPollingThenWorkAsync();
  }
}

async Task DoPollingThenWorkAsync(SemaphoreSlim semaphore)
{
  var msg = Poll();
  if (msg != null)
  {
    await Task.Delay(3000); // process the I/O-bound job
  }

  // this assumes you don't have to worry about exceptions
  // otherwise consider try-finally
  semaphore.Release();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This makes sense. However in the very top-level caller, I can't use await since there is no async modifier. So I still need to have Task.Run(async () => await WorkerMainAsync()) as the entry point of the worker. –  Hengyi Oct 14 '13 at 2:54
    
@Hengyi Not really, depending on the kind of application you're writing you can: 1. Make your top level caller async too (e.g. async void event handler in UI application). 2. Synchronously wait (WorkerMainAsync().Wait()). This partially defeats the purpose of async, but it can make sense when you need to synchronously wait. 3. Don't wait at all (just WorkerMainAsync()). This means you're not going to learn about exceptions in that method and it can also mean that your application exits before the worker completes. –  svick Oct 14 '13 at 8:44
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Usually you don't use async/await inside a CPU-bound task. The method that starts such a task (WorkerMainAsync) can use async/await, but you should be tracking pending tasks:

async Task WorkerMainAsync()
{
  SemaphoreSlim ss = new SemaphoreSlim(10);
  List<Task> trackedTasks = new List<Task>();
  while (DoMore())
  {
    await ss.WaitAsync();
    trackedTasks.Add(Task.Run(() => 
              {
                DoPollingThenWorkAsync();
                ss.Release();
              }));
  }
  await Task.WhenAll(trackedTasks);
}

void DoPollingThenWorkAsync()
{
  var msg = Poll();
  if (msg != null)
  {
    Thread.Sleep(2000); // process the long running CPU-bound job
  }
}

Another exercise would be to remove tasks from trackedTasks as they are finishing. For example, you could use ContinueWith to remove a finished tasks (in this case, remember to use lock to protect trackedTasks from simultaneous access).

If you really need to use await inside DoPollingThenWorkAsync, the code wouldn't change a lot:

    trackedTasks.Add(Task.Run(async () => 
              {
                await DoPollingThenWorkAsync();
                ss.Release();
              }));

Note that in this case, you'd be dealing with a nested task here for the async lambda, which Task.Run will automatically unwrap for you.

share|improve this answer
    
The work is mostly IO bound. async lambda with trackedTasks works. I have var t = Task.Run(async lambda); trackedTasks.Add(t); t.ContinueWith(RemoveTask). So the second option looks good now. Any other pitfalls? –  Hengyi Oct 13 '13 at 7:05
    
If the work is mostly IO-bound, I'd suggest using the pattern proposed by svick. Note however, await captures the execution context by default (see Task.ConfigureAwait). So if you do async IO-bound calls on the UI thread, and still do some CPU-bound work between the IO-bound calls which keeps the thread busy for more than 50ms, such task may be a good candidate for Task.Run. –  Noseratio Oct 13 '13 at 10:44
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