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I have some problem with bash script.

I've got a string which has some repeated patterns like this.

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 ...

Each fields is separated by tab key.

I want it to look like this...

1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
…

How can I solve this problem using bash script like cut, sed, awk ... ?

I've tried some command like cut -f 'seq 4, 4, 40' example.txt

It doesn't work...

It looks very easy but so difficult to me...

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Will there always be 4 fields being repeated or will that vary? –  anubhava Oct 13 '13 at 4:20

6 Answers 6

You can use sed like this:

s='1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4'
p='1 2 3 4'
echo "$s"|sed "s/$p\s*/&\n/g"
1 2 3 4 
1 2 3 4 
1 2 3 4 
1 2 3 4

Live Demo: http://ideone.com/P59OCJ

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Here's a pure bash solution:

IFS=$'\t' set -- $(<input_file)
seen=()
while [[ $1 ]]; do
  if (( ${seen[$1]} )); then # If we've seen the value before, start a new line.
    echo
    unset seen
  fi
  printf '%s ' "$1"
  seen[$1]=1
  shift
done
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If you know the ending number of your sequence beforehand, you can do something like:

LAST_NUMBER=4
sed -e "s/$LAST_NUMBER\t*/&\n/g" < example.txt

Just replace 4 with the last number from the sequence

If you don't know the number, you have to search through it using the following:

#!/bin/bash

declare -A CHECKED_NUMBERS
LAST_NUMBER=

while read LINE; do
    SPLIT_LINE=$(cut -d" " -f1- <<< "$LINE")

    for number in $SPLIT_LINE; do 
        if [ "${CHECKED_NUMBERS[$number]}" == "1" ]; then
            LAST_NUMBER=$number
        else
            CHECKED_NUMBERS[$number]=1
        fi
    done
done < example.txt

# do the replacement 
sed -e "s/$LAST_NUMBER\t*/&\n/g" < example.txt
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An awk version

awk  '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {printf "%s"(i%4?" ":"\n"),$i}}' file
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4

An gnu awk version

awk -v RS="\t" '{printf "%s"(NR%4?" ":"\n"),$0}' file
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
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xargs may help:

kent$  echo "1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4"|xargs -n4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
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This might work for you:

printf "%s\t%s\t%s\t%s\n" $string

or you want the fields space separated:

printf "%s %s %s %s\n" $string
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