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When this functions returns from it's call, I can't seem to print anything from it. When i try print from within the function, it works correctly but it won't print after the call. Not sure what to do.

    int *sched;
    getSchedFile(schFile, sched);
    printf("%d\n",sched[1]);

void getSchedFile (FILE *file, int *schd){
    /* Get the number of bytes */
    fseek(file, 0L, SEEK_END);
    int bytes = ftell(file);
    fseek(file, 0L, SEEK_SET);
    schd = malloc(bytes * sizeof(int));
    int pos = 0, curDigit;
    while((fscanf(file, "%d", &curDigit)) != EOF){
        schd[pos]=curDigit;
        ++pos;
    } 
}
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closed as unclear what you're asking by Cole Johnson, H2CO3, Harry, Lorenzo Donati, MBZ Oct 13 '13 at 15:39

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You're passing the a copy of the value contained in the sched pointer to the function. Inside the function, you set the value of the copy to be the address of the memory you malloc. Since you're passing the value stored in the pointer, rather than the address of the memory that contains the pointer, any change made is discarded. If you pass the address of *sched, then you can change the location that it (sched) points to - aka you can persist the changes made. –  enhzflep Oct 13 '13 at 4:38
    
possible duplicate of Passing char pointer in C –  user529758 Oct 13 '13 at 5:08
    
That ^^ is literally the first hit of Google for "passing pointer does not work C". Why don't you do research before asking? –  user529758 Oct 13 '13 at 5:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should pass a pointer to your pointer, by changing:

getSchedFile(schFile, sched);

to:

getSchedFile(schFile, &sched);

and:

void getSchedFile (FILE *file, int *schd) {

to:

void getSchedFile (FILE *file, int ** schd) {

otherwise you're only changing the local version of the pointer in the function, not your original one. For simplicity in avoiding too much indirection, you could change the function to:

void getSchedFile (FILE *file, int ** schd) {

    /* Get the number of bytes */

    fseek(file, 0L, SEEK_END);
    int bytes = ftell(file);
    fseek(file, 0L, SEEK_SET);

    int * pschd = malloc(bytes * sizeof(int));
    if ( pschd == NULL ) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Couldn't allocate memory.\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    int pos = 0, curDigit;
    while((fscanf(file, "%d", &curDigit)) != EOF){
        pschd[pos]=curDigit;
        ++pos;
    } 

    *schd = pschd;  /*  Update original pointer  */
}

As Charlie mentions, if you're reading with %d, then the number of bytes in the file isn't going to be the same as the number of ints you read from it, although you at least won't allocate too little memory.

EDIT: You may also want to give the function a return type of int and return pos - 1, so that the caller knows how many elements are in your new array (or the index of the last element, just return pos for the actual number of elements).

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Thanks that worked. Yeah i know that %d means over allocating but I don't know any other way to do it. I thought at least this way it would be a rough estimate. –  ThomasTheTankEngine Oct 13 '13 at 4:47
    
@ThomasTheTankEngine: You could at least do (bytes / 2) + 1, since the worst case would be a single digit, followed by a single whitespace character, all the way through to the end of the file. A second way, more efficient on space but less efficient on time, would be to take a pass through the file and count them, allocate the correct amount of memory, and then take a second pass through to actually read and store them. Calling realloc() once the necessary size is known is another option. –  Paul Griffiths Oct 13 '13 at 4:49

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