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I've searched SO and can find questions addressing similar subjects, but nothing for this specific question and language. After reading some Q&A and not finding the answer, I searched , and and got zero results.

I've been asked this question in a university quiz:

If I have:

int n = 3;
   for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)  {
      System.out.print(" x ");
        for (int j = 1; j <= n; j++)  {
         System.out.println(" x ");
           continue;
           //no content here
        }
     }

Without there being any content after the continue statement; how does this using continue affect this loop? Does it cause a break in the second loop of does the loop continue to iterate?

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2  
There is no sense of putting a continue like that. Removing it will give you same behaviour. Basically, it is used to continue the iteration of current loop, without moving further. –  Rohit Jain Oct 13 '13 at 6:40
    
    
@RohitJain I have been asked this question for university and I was baffled as to why it would be put there; as I figured as much –  user2776866 Oct 13 '13 at 6:43
    
@GV that question does not answer a nested for loop like this. Please check –  user2776866 Oct 13 '13 at 6:44
    
@RohitJain you answered the question for me in the first instance imaginary +1 :) –  user2776866 Oct 13 '13 at 6:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If there was a code under the continue, it'll be a dead code.

The way you wrote it, it has no effect since it's already the last line.. The loop would have continued if there was no continue;.

These two blocks of code has the same effect:

for(int i=0; i < 10; i++) {
   //Code
}

for(int i=0; i < 10; i++) {
   //Code
   continue;
}
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1  
Thank you, you answered my question exactly. Simply, concisely and accurately –  user2776866 Oct 13 '13 at 6:51

A continue statement without a label will re-execute from the condition the innermost while or do, or loop, and from the update expression the innermost for loop. It is often used to early-terminate a loop's processing and thereby avoid deeply-nested if statements.

Hence for your program , the keywork continue doesn't make much sense. It is used as a kind of a escape thing. For e.g:

aLoopName: for (;;) {
  // ...
  while (someCondition)
  // ...
    if (otherCondition)
      continue aLoopName;

Say, if you modify your program like:

int n = 3;
   for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)  {
      System.out.print(" x ");
        for (int j = 1; j <= n; j++)  {
         if(j%2!=0)
         {
          System.out.println(" x ");
          continue;
         }
         else
         break;
     }

This will break the inner for loop for j=2. Hope you understand. :)

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You are not answering my question specifically addresses the nested for loops without an if or while and yes, I do understand this. What I don't understand is why you are using while and if in your answer –  user2776866 Oct 13 '13 at 6:46
    
Your question is seemingly vague. The continue keyword placed in the inner for loop has no sense. Even if you remove the keyword it wont make any difference. It's better to understand how and when continue is used and not use it randomly anywhere. –  user2339071 Oct 13 '13 at 6:49
    
It is not vague, it is straightforward and clear, just because it is redundant within the code, doesn't mean it's vague –  user2776866 Oct 13 '13 at 6:53

The answer to your question:

How does this using continue affect this loop? Does it cause a break in the second loop of does the loop continue to iterate?

is:

The second loop will not break, it will continue to iterate. break keyword is for breaking loop.

EDIT

Suppose you have for loop:

for(int i = 0; i < 5; i++){
   continue;
}

continue in for executes the statement of for loop (i++) to continue to the next iteration.

In other loops, while{} or do{}while(); the things will not be like this and may cause infinite loops.

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