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How do I make getFoo() and getBar() threadsafe? so that at the same time one thread can call getFoo() and another can call getBar()... i.e. I don't want to synchronize on the class level lock..

private static Foo foo; 
private static Bar bar;     


private static void initBar() {
    bar = SomeOtherClass.getBarVal();
}

private static void initFoo() {
    foo = SomeOtherClass.getFooVal();
}

public static Foo getFoo() {
    if (foo == null) {
        initFoo();
    }
    return foo;
}

public static Bar getBar() {
    if (bar == null) {
        initBar();
    }
    return bar;
}
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You want two threads to access those methods at the same time? –  Rohit Jain Oct 13 '13 at 7:21
    
Why don't you want to use the class-level lock? That's a classic use case. Make your own lock if you can't use the class. –  Jim Garrison Oct 13 '13 at 7:21
    
Why not making the methods synchronized ? –  ExpertSystem Oct 13 '13 at 7:23
    
I don't want to use the class-level lock cause then while one thread is calling getFoo() another thread won't be able to call getBar()... How can I make my own lock? Do you suggest doing some thing like private static final Object lock = new Object(); and then using lock in the synchronized(lock) block? can you please show with an example...? –  Manav Oct 13 '13 at 7:23
1  
then use two locks for both methods –  UDPLover Oct 13 '13 at 7:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need to lock getFoo() and getBar(), only the init blocks:

private static volatile Foo foo; 
private static volatile Bar bar;     
private static final Object fooLock = new Object();
private static final Object barLock = new Object();

private static void initBar() {
    bar = SomeOtherClass.getBarVal();
}

private static void initFoo() {
    foo = SomeOtherClass.getFooVal();
}

public static Foo getFoo() {
    if (foo == null) {
        synchronized (fooLock) {
            if (foo == null) {
                initFoo();
            }
        }
    }
    return foo;
}

public static Foo getBar() {
    if (bar == null) {
        synchronized (barLock) {
            if (bar == null) {
                initBar();
            }
        }
    }
    return foo;
}
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See edited answer - you can always replace MyClass.class with a plain old Obejct, like my edit suggests. –  Mureinik Oct 13 '13 at 7:25
    
will only one lock do? or will I have to create two different locks? –  Manav Oct 13 '13 at 7:25
    
@Manav If you want those methods to be run parallel by two different threads, then you would need two different locks. –  Rohit Jain Oct 13 '13 at 7:26
    
if initFoo() and initBar() have nothing to do with each other - than yes, two different locks. I'll fix my answer accordingly. –  Mureinik Oct 13 '13 at 7:27
1  
@Manav "So should the null check be inside the synchronized block or outside?" - both. Synchronizing is an expensive operation. I first check outside the sync block, since if the object is already initialized, there is no need for synchronizing. Once I've synchronized, I check again, to make sure the object hasn't been initialized between the last check and the synchronizing start. –  Mureinik Oct 13 '13 at 7:31
private static Foo foo;
private static Bar bar;

private static final Object fooLock = new Object();
private static final Object barLock = new Object();

private static void initBar() {
    bar = SomeOtherClass.getBarVal();
}

private static void initFoo() {
    foo = SomeOtherClass.getFooVal();
}

public static Foo getFoo() {
    synchronized(fooLock){
        if (foo == null) {
            initFoo();
        }
    }
    return foo;
}

public static Bar getBar() {
    synchronized(barLock){
        if (bar == null) {
            initBar();
        }
    }
    return bar;
}

Use two locks.

EDIT

If you are using singleton pattern, I suggest reading on:

simply singleton

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1  
checking for null twice once outside and once inside the synchronized blocks will be more efficient.. –  Manav Oct 13 '13 at 7:37
    
hmmm that makes sense... especially the last para on page4.. thanks –  Manav Oct 13 '13 at 8:13
  public static Foo getBar() {
      return BarInstanceHolder.barInstance; 
  }

  public static Foo getFoo() {
      return FooInstanceHolder.fooInstance;
  }

  private static final class BarInstanceHolder {
    static final Bar barInstance = SomeOtherClass.getBarVal();   
  }


  private static final class FooInstanceHolder {
    static final Foo fooInstance = SomeOtherClass.getFooVal();   
  }
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ok but in my case it might be that at some times the SomeOtherClass.getBarVal() and SomeOtherClass.getFooVal() might return null.. and if they do then next time I want to call them again... in your solution this won't be possible right?... but your solution is good as it is endorsed by effective java... –  Manav Oct 13 '13 at 7:50
    
your requirement is not clear :( e.g) what is SomeOtherClass..? how it is passed? how it is changed? when it will return null ? if it return null how calling again will return other than null? I am confused... –  Kanagavelu Sugumar Oct 13 '13 at 10:58
  private static final class FooInstanceHolder {
static final Foo fooInstance = SomeOtherClass.getFooVal();   

}

Initialize foo when class FooInstanceHolder is loaded into memory.No method can be called before a class is loaded completely.

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