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Can anyone recommend an Sqlite C# ORM code generation tool.

I have found the Habanero framework, any comments on that?

Thanks

UPDATE

I have gone with Subsonic in this instance. To help anyone else out, here is a 'basic' example of creating a class and using Subsonic and Sqlite together.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Data.SQLite;
using SubSonic;
using SubSonic.Schema;
using SubSonic.Repository;
using SubSonic.DataProviders;

namespace SubsonicSqliteTest
{
    public class User
    {
        public User()
        {
            ID = Guid.NewGuid();

            // Set Defaults
            FirstName = String.Empty;
            LastName = String.Empty;
            Username = String.Empty;
            Password = String.Empty;
            IsAdministrator = 0;
        }

        public Guid ID { get; set; }
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public string Username { get; set; }
        public string Password { get; set; }
        public int IsAdministrator { get; set; }
        public DateTime? CreatedDate { get; set; }
        public DateTime? LastUpdatedDate { get; set; }

        public static User Get(Guid id)
        {
            string databasePath = System.IO.Path.Combine(System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(Application.ExecutablePath), "Database.db");
            IDataProvider provider = ProviderFactory.GetProvider("Data Source=" + databasePath + ";Version=3;New=True;Pooling=True;Max Pool Size=1;", "System.Data.SQLite");
            var repository = new SimpleRepository(provider, SimpleRepositoryOptions.RunMigrations);
            var users = from user in repository.All<User>()
                        where user.ID == id
                        select user;

            foreach (var user in users)
            {
                return user;
            }

            return null;
        }

        public User Save()
        {
            string databasePath = System.IO.Path.Combine(System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(Application.ExecutablePath), "Database.db");
            IDataProvider provider = ProviderFactory.GetProvider("Data Source=" + databasePath + ";Version=3;New=True;Pooling=True;Max Pool Size=1;", "System.Data.SQLite");
            var repository = new SimpleRepository(provider, SimpleRepositoryOptions.RunMigrations);
            repository.Add(this);
            return this;
        }
    }
}
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Habanero looks too big for my requirements in this case. We do have our own framework which is also too heavy-weight and am in fact replacing it in this instance. –  Mark Redman Dec 20 '09 at 12:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Others have already posted about NHibernate (especially with Fluent NHibernate) and ADO.Net Entity Framework which are both great. You may also want to look at SubSonic. If you are considering SQLite then your database requirements must be fairly simple and SubSonic's SimpleRepository option is super easy to use.

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Yes, my requirements are ver simple, just need a very lightweight datastore and would rather try sqlite than access. –  Mark Redman Dec 20 '09 at 8:57
    
The SubSonic SimpleRepository looks pretty good for small apps and quick proof-of-concepts! Any idea on how to connect a SimpleRepository to Sqlite DataProvider or how to configure an Sqlite connection string? –  Mark Redman Dec 20 '09 at 12:07
    
I am going to go with Subsonic SimpleRepository, thanks for the help. (I have included a basic class that demonstrates Sqlite and Subsonic in the Question) –  Mark Redman Dec 20 '09 at 15:54
    
Glad I could help out. Looks like you found the connections string, right? –  Mark Ewer Dec 21 '09 at 1:11

Several .NET object-relational mappers support SQLite. See this question a list of .NET ORMs: of the ones mentioned there, I know that NHibernate and LightSpeed support SQLite, as does the Entity Framework does via the provider mentioned in eWolf's answer. I am not sure about others.

In terms of code generation, LightSpeed and the Entity Framework (via System.Data.SQLite) include tools for importing an existing SQLite database schema; I'm not sure about NHibernate. (Disclosure: I work for the company that makes LightSpeed; trying to keep the answer factual though!)

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I don't know if it is exactly what you're looking for; have you already seen this?

http://sqlite.phxsoftware.com/

You can use it with ADO.NET 2.0 or the ADO.NET 3.5 Entity Framework.

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This also looks good, just trying to connect SubSonic to this... –  Mark Redman Dec 20 '09 at 12:08
    
thanks, but link is dead –  Diego Vieira Jul 16 '13 at 3:08

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NHibernate

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ADO.NET%5FEntity%5FFramework

you can also use the linq to sql magic thingy

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1  
I'm pretty sure the "LINQ to SQL magic thingy" only works with SQL Server. –  itowlson Dec 19 '09 at 23:13
    
im not... but it kinda sucks anyhow... this helps? sqlite.phxsoftware.com –  AK_ Dec 19 '09 at 23:29
    
LINQ to SQL is only for MSSQL server. But, the Entity Framework gives you a strong LINQ provider so you can do basically the same stuff. –  Mark Ewer Dec 20 '09 at 1:01

This is a very powerful ORM, generate the code friendly http://www.schematrix.com

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