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I have a MySQL database with two tables (simplified for this question):
movies table columns: id, title, duration, description, created_at, updated_at
rentals table columns: id, movie_id, status, created_at, updated_at

The rental status is either 'CHECKED OUT' or 'RETURNED', so a movie is available if it either has no associated rental, or all of its associated rentals have a status of 'RETURNED'. How do I query available movies? Right now I've got this:

SELECT rentals.id,rentals.status,movies.* 
FROM `movies` 
LEFT OUTER JOIN rentals ON movies.id = rentals.movie_id 
        AND movies.kiosk_id = rentals.kiosk_id 
WHERE (`movies`.kiosk_id = 1 
        AND (rentals.id is null or rentals.status != 'CHECKED OUT'));

The problem is this query returns multiple records for a movie if it's been checked out several times, so my ORM gives me duplicate movie objects. Is there some way to specify that I only want unique movie.id's? Should I have some different database schema? Or should I sort it out programatically (seems like it would be too slow)?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not sure what you want with the rentals id, so I took it out.

SELECT
  rentals.status, movies.*
FROM movies
LEFT OUTER JOIN (
  SELECT
    movie_id,
    kiosk_id,
    -- Because 'CHECKED OUT' comes alphabetically before 'RETURNED',
    -- this will have 'CHECKED OUT' if there's at least one rental checked out
    MIN(status) AS status
  FROM rentals
  GROUP BY movie_id, kiosk_id) rentals
ON movies.id = rentals.movie_id
AND movies.kiosk_id = rentals.kiosk_id
WHERE movies.kiosk_id = 1
AND (rentals.id is null or rentals.status != 'CHECKED OUT');
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the only problem with your answer was that i needed to add 'id' after the second select, but after that it worked well, thanks! –  aaronstacy Dec 19 '09 at 23:28

I think you want the distinct rentals.id in your query. try this:

SELECT DISTINCT rentals.id,rentals.status,movies.* 
FROM `movies` 
LEFT OUTER JOIN rentals ON movies.id = rentals.movie_id 
        AND movies.kiosk_id = rentals.kiosk_id 
WHERE (`movies`.kiosk_id = 1 
        AND (rentals.id is null or rentals.status != 'CHECKED OUT'));
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no, when i add DISTINCT to the query it is the same as without it. is there a way to specify which field is to be distinct? –  aaronstacy Dec 19 '09 at 23:04
    
this will not work because it is likely that every rental has its own ID. So there will be no duplicates in the result event without DISTINCT, but there will be duplicated movies.id –  Dmitry Dec 19 '09 at 23:09

Why do a LEFT OUTER JOIN? A simple LEFT JOIN should suffice.

You should also move the rentals.status to the ON() bit (I think):

SELECT DISTINCT movies.id, movies.*, rentals.id, rentals.status
FROM `movies` 
LEFT JOIN rentals ON (movies.id = rentals.movie_id AND movies.kiosk_id = rentals.kiosk_id AND rentals.status != 'CHECKED OUT')
WHERE `movies`.kiosk_id = 1 AND rentals.id is null

//Edit You'll also need a distinct

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A LEFT JOIN and a LEFT OUTER JOIN are the same thing. –  Bill Karwin Dec 19 '09 at 23:14

Your problem that you want a result that makes no sense. You want available movies -- that's ok, but what would a rental id mean in the same row with some movie id? You should throw away rentals in SELECT list and after that applying DISTINCT to just movies.id will do the trick

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If you need all available movies for rental you can try this: SELECT movies.* FROM movies LEFT JOIN ( SELECT DISTINCT movie_id FROM rentals WHERE status!='CHECKED OUT' AND kiosk_id=1) r ON movies.movie_id=r.movie_id

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