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AngularJS + OOP is kinda sexy feature to use

Hi, I'm successfully using OOP with AngularJs for some time already (first started with angularjs with oop inheritance in action), the provided approach allows you define your classes as angular services, which you can later extend or inherit from like that:

Application.factory('AbstractObject', [function () {
    var AbstractObject = Class.extend({
        virtualMethod: function() {
           alert("Hello world");
        },
        abstractMethod: function() { // You may omit abstract definitions, but they make your interface more readable
           throw new Error("Pure abstract call");
        }
    });

    return AbstractObject; // You return class definition instead of it's instance
}]);

Application.factory('DerivedObject', ['AbstractObject', function (AbstractObject) {
    var DerivedObject = AbstractObject.extend({
        virtualMethod: function() { // Shows two alerts: `Hey!` and `Hello world`
            alert("Hey!");

            this._super();
        },
        abstractMethod: function() {
            alert("Now I'm not abstract");
        }
    });

    return DerivedObject;
}]);

Plunker: http://plnkr.co/edit/rAtVGAsNYggBhNADMeoT

using the described approach gives you the ability to define classes that beautifully integrate into angular infrastructure. You get all sort of nifty features from two worlds - OOP and AngularJs. Dependency injection is free for your classes, and it makes your classes simple, allows putting a lot of boilerplate controller code into some base class that can be later reused.

However

AngularJs infrastructure blocks previously described approach from spreading it's wings on all 100%. The problem occurs when you try to define recursive class definitions (i.e. recursive aggregation), say you have two class definitions like Blog and Tag

Application.factory('Blog', ['Tag', function (Tag) {
    var Blog = Class.extend({
        tags: function() {
            return this.tags;
        }
    });

    return Blog;
}]);

Application.factory('Tag', ['Blog', function (Blog) {
    var Tag = Class.extend({
        Blogs: function() {
           return this.blogs;
        }
    });

    return Tag;
}]);

It won't work because both Blog and Tag are self-referencing themselves causing circular dependency.

P.S

The last thing, I have found kinda ugly solution that solves my problem in my specific case but doesn't work in general and as I said, it isn't pretty:

Application.factory('BlogNamespace', [function () {
    var Blog = Class.extend({
        tags: function() {
            return this.tags;
        }
    });

    var Tag = Class.extend({
        Blogs: function() {
           return this.blogs;
        }
    });

    return {
        Tag: Tag,
        Blog: Blog
    };
}]);

Question

The above fix won't work because namespaces may also be a subject of circular dependency. This means that it isn't solution to described problem but rather one level deeper problem now.

Any suggestions on how it is possible to solve described problem in general case?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

A circular dependency is always the sign of mixing of concerns, which is a really bad thing. Miško Hevery, one of the authors of AngularJS, explains a nice solution on his awesome blog. In short, you probably have a third service hidden somewhere, which is the only part of your code really needed by the two others.

share|improve this answer
    
Blackhole, it's very interesting post you've provided, my case with Tag and Blog proves that Misko is right, because these are sort of database entities that relate one to another as N:M and in relational bases world this kind of situation is also resolved by representing third relational table that holds reference to both Tag and Blog such as BlogTags –  Lu4 Oct 13 '13 at 13:07
    
I'm trying to decouple existing logic, will se what it will lead to... –  Lu4 Oct 13 '13 at 13:51
    
So far so good... The flight is stable, described approach really helps with identifying problematic implementation points. –  Lu4 Oct 14 '13 at 19:44
    
I think that your approach is correct and having circular deps in code is kinda bad thing to do, so the answer goes to you –  Lu4 Nov 18 '13 at 23:48
    
@Lu4 did you solve this by adding a BlogTags factory that Blog and Tag get injected with? I'd really rather not add "joining table" classes into my code base if I can help it... If my only other option is circular dependencies using $injetor.get as you pointed out, I might just stick with that. –  Brett Dec 9 '14 at 7:04

I'm answering my own question just because I've found a technical way of resolving the issue that I have originally posted about. But before that, I strongly encourage you to use Blackhole's suggestion since it allows solving a broader set of problems which are usually caused by bad architecture. Please prefer using his approach first, and return to current one in case that you know what you are doing.

So here goes:

You can use $injector service and inject required definitions at run-time, which is legal from technical point of view, but again according to this post (hard to imagine that it is written in 2008), this is like a black magic, do that and it will strike you back:

Application.factory('Blog', ['$injector', function ($injector) {
    var Tag = $injector.get('Tag'); // Here is your tag

    ...    
}]);

Application.factory('Tag', ['Blog', function (Blog) {
    ...
}]);

Edit

It turned out that current approach is an example of Service Locator pattern, which is IoC Antipattern.

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This answer save my day! +1 –  jmcollin92 Oct 15 '14 at 16:04
4  
Join the dark side :) –  Lu4 Oct 15 '14 at 22:04
    
I would suggest not to worry much about the anti-pattern comments/opinions on Service Locator, as not everyone (including me) agrees with it. In the other hand what you are trying to do here is just modeling objects and their relations using an Angular-specific mechanism to achieve it (whose original purpose is other), and therefor you should not have to worry about removing cycling dependencies (unless you cannot find a workaround, which you already found). –  Rodrigo Quesada May 5 at 14:29
    
@RodrigoQuesada your suggestion is a suggestion of a truly young and passionate developer :) It's really cool that you subject dogmas and paradigms, it means you pick your own way. However to me it looks funny because I'm already too old to follow it. Please don't take my words as an insult, rather treat them as the voice of experience, the sound of your future. I find multitude reasons to worry about your proposition. One of them is the fact that I know that they were written by blood of many innocent developers. And I don't need everybody to agree with this fact, I just need the smart guys –  Lu4 May 5 at 19:49
    
Sure, the thing is that in this case (which is that of using AngularJS' providers for implementing OOP) you should not worry about changing your OO model (and thus stray away from your mental model?) when the reason for it is that you are following advises that were meant for something else. If you were implementing an application using any (yes, any) dependency injection framework in a language originally design with OOP in mind, you would not have this kind of issues, because you would not be trying to "inject" a class definition (you would probably just use an import statement). –  Rodrigo Quesada May 6 at 7:38

Have a look at js-data-angular. It has a great implementation for relations.

share|improve this answer
    
The links are broken... –  Lu4 May 6 at 10:59
    
Thanx, fixed it. –  Koen Raymundus Swinkels May 8 at 10:30

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