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I'm trying to make a function that gets me the number of alive cells in a game of life. The goal is to look into an int list list, and, given the coordinates of a cell, return the number of alive cells next to it.
The problem is that my function seems to answer completely at random, and i don't see what can cause this in the code
This is a class assignment, so I'm not asking for a specific answer, just for a hint as to where the problem might lie

here's my code :

(* nth : reimplementation of List.nth that returns 0 if there is no such
 * element
 * [int list -> int -> int] *)

 let rec nth l n =
    match l with
        | [] -> 0
        | a::l -> if n = 0 
            then a 
            else nth l (n-1);;

(* get_cell : given a couple of coordinates, returns the value at the
 * coordinates on the matrix 
 * [int * int -> int list list -> int] *)

let rec get_cell (x,y) matrix = 
    match (List.nth matrix y) with
        | [] -> empty
        | l  -> nth l x;;

(* count_neighbours : given a couple of coordinates and a matrix, returns the 
 * number of alive cells in the neighborhood of the designed cell 
 * [int * int -> int list list -> int] *)

let count_neighbours (x,y) matrix =
    let neighbors = [ (x-1,y-1); (x-1,y); (x-1,y+1); 
                      (x,y-1); (x,y+1);
                      (x+1,y-1); (x+1,y); (x+1,y+1); ] in
    let rec aux = (function 
        | [] -> 0
        | h::t -> (get_cell h matrix) + aux (t)
    ) in
    aux neighbors;;

and here's an example session :

# let test_board = [[0; 1; 1; 1; 1]; [1; 0; 0; 0; 0]; [1; 0; 1; 0; 0]; [0; 1; 0; 0; 0];
   [0; 1; 1; 0; 1]];;
val test_board : int list list =
  [[0; 1; 1; 1; 1]; [1; 0; 0; 0; 0]; [1; 0; 1; 0; 0]; [0; 1; 0; 0; 0];
   [0; 1; 1; 0; 1]]
# count_neighbours (3,3) test_board;;
- : int = 3
# get_cell (2,2) test_board;;
- : int = 1
# get_cell (2,3) test_board;;
- : int = 0
# get_cell (2,4) test_board;;
- : int = 1
# get_cell (3,2) test_board;;
- : int = 0
# get_cell (3,4) test_board;;
- : int = 0
# get_cell (4,2) test_board;;
- : int = 0
# get_cell (4,3) test_board;;
- : int = 0
# get_cell (4,4) test_board;;
- : int = 1

As you can see, random results... Thanks for your help.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As I understand it, it's not completely random, unless you specify randomness. :-)

I'm pretty sure it's just a minor thing of using the right coordinates to getting your cell. Since you've mentioned that this is a homework assignment, I'll just point you towards getting the solution, than one rightaway.

What does List.nth test_board x give you? x being any of the numbers you entered above.

After doing some minor adjustments, mine gives me this result:

# get_cell (2,4) test_board;;
- : int = 0
# count_neighbours (3,3) test_board;;
- : int = 3

Good luck.

EDIT As for the count_neighbours implementation, it helps if you look at it as a list of lists as shown below.

Take your test_board, it looks something like this to the oCaml compiler:

    0  1  2  3  4
0  [0; 1; 1; 1; 1];
1  [1; 0; 0; 0; 0]; 
2  [1; 0; 1; 0; 0]; 
3  [0; 1; 0; **0**; 0];
4  [0; 1; 1; 0; 1];

I have highlighted the cell corresponding to (3, 3). There are three 1s shown there - top left, bottom left and bottom right.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input, but i'm confused : # count_neighbours (3,3) test_board;; shouldn't return - : int = 3 but rather - : int = 1 if I'm not mistaken. –  Wxcafe_ Oct 13 '13 at 11:35
    
That's because there are 3 1s along the diagonals to the cell (3,3). Look at your implementation of count_neighbours and how you build the neighours list. So, once you get all the 1s, you're just adding them up. –  S.R.I Oct 13 '13 at 11:44
    
I know about that, but I can't seem to find the three 1s. The diagonal is made of 000 010 100 please correct me if I'm wrong, but it looks like we're not looking at the same diagonal... –  Wxcafe_ Oct 13 '13 at 12:22
    
See my edit. In (x, y) - x stands for the rows and y stands for the columns. That said, in your implementation, you should probably also check for list bounds so that you don't accidentally look for elements that are not in list's range. –  S.R.I Oct 13 '13 at 12:33
    
alright, i didn't get that the lists were numbered from 0 :) thanks for your help! –  Wxcafe_ Oct 13 '13 at 12:45

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