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Here is my class with two methods modifying the List PacketQueue. These two methods are execute in two thread, so synchronize is tagged.

public class MessageHandler implements nuctrl.interfaces.MessageHandler, Runnable {
    private static final List<GatewayMsg> PacketQueue = new LinkedList<GatewayMsg>();

    @Override
    public void insert(GatewayMsg msg) {
        synchronized (PacketQueue){
            PacketQueue.add(msg);
            PacketQueue.notify();
        }
        log.debug("insert " + msg.toString());
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        while(running){
            synchronized (PacketQueue){
                try {
                    while(PacketQueue.size() == 0){
                        PacketQueue.wait();
                    }
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                    break;
                }
                for (GatewayMsg msg : PacketQueue){
                    PacketQueue.remove(msg);
                    packetHandler.onPacket(msg);//method call
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

run() is for thread-4 and insert() is for another thread(I/O Worker #1). Synchronized has been added, and everything seems ok, but I still kept getting ConcurrentModificationException.

DEBUG [New I/O worker #1] (MessageHandler.java:47)| insert GatewayMsg<>
Exception in thread "Thread-4" java.util.ConcurrentModificationException
    at java.util.LinkedList$ListItr.checkForComodification(LinkedList.java:761)
    at java.util.LinkedList$ListItr.next(LinkedList.java:696)
    at nuctrl.core.MessageHandler.run(MessageHandler.java:67)
    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:680)

It drives me crazy now! Can anyone help find the fault? Or other ways to do the same thing?

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marked as duplicate by Kayaman, Boris the Spider, Mark Hurd, Aniket Thakur, doitlikejustin Oct 13 '13 at 17:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
The solution and logic for showing list entry after each change is not very cool, so why don't you show the content just after the insertion in insert() method?! and also it may have a bug when you have one (or more) object(s) in the list, so the run() is going to lock and showing the entry forever. –  user2511414 Oct 13 '13 at 14:20
    
Seems like you are try to solve 'producer-consumer problem'. If so you may want to look at BlockingQueue in java which helps you do that neatly. –  KumarM Oct 13 '13 at 14:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Synchronizing doesn't do anything to prevent the ConcurrentModificationException if the synchronized code modifies the collection during iteration, which you do here:

for (GatewayMsg msg : PacketQueue){
    PacketQueue.remove(msg);     // <== Not allowed during iteration
    packetHandler.onPacket(msg);
}

During an iteration, you may only remove elements via an Iterator, e.g.:

Iterator<GatewayMsg> it = PacketQueue.iterator();
while (it.hasNext()) {
    GatewayMsg msg = it.next();
    it.remove();                 // <== This is allowed, provided the collection supports it
    packetHandler.onPacket(msg);
}
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Good catch buddy :) –  user2511414 Oct 13 '13 at 14:21
    
That's it. Very helpful. I've got a lot to learn. Thanks :) –  bl4ck5un Oct 13 '13 at 15:11
    
@Crowder, and could you explain the difference between for(:) and Iterator? –  bl4ck5un Oct 13 '13 at 15:29
    
@ColinZ: The enhanced for statement is just a shorthand way of using an iterator behind the scenes (see that link for details). But with an enhanced for statement, you can't use the iterator directly, so you can't access its remove method, which you need if you want to remove things during the iteration. –  T.J. Crowder Oct 13 '13 at 15:42
    
@Crowder Your saying you can't use the iterator directly means that PacketQueue.remove(msg) actually calls the remove() method of iterator but not the List.remove()? –  bl4ck5un Oct 14 '13 at 1:36

This has nothing to do with synchronizing - code like that would trigger the exception even in a single thread:

for (GatewayMsg msg : PacketQueue){
    PacketQueue.remove(msg);
    packetHandler.onPacket(msg);
}

This is because you are modifying the collection that you are iterating.

To fix this problem, use a list iterator in a loop, and call iterator's remove. Better yet, process all items in a loop, and then clear PacketQueue all at once, like this:

for (GatewayMsg msg : PacketQueue){
    packetHandler.onPacket(msg);
}
PacketQueue.clear();

This will work fine, because the access to PacketQueue is synchronized: other threads will not see PacketQueue in a state where part of its messages are processed, but they still remain in the queue.

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Good catch buddy :) –  user2511414 Oct 13 '13 at 14:21

The reason you get a CME is because you are modifying while iterating over it. The library can't tell the difference between your thread and another thread modifying it.


The simplest solution is to not write this queue/thread handling code yourself. I would write it using a ExecutorService

public class MessageHandler implements nuctrl.interfaces.MessageHandler {
    private static final ExecutorService EXEC = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

    @Override
    public void insert(final GatewayMsg msg) {
        EXEC.submit(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                packetHandler.onPacket(msg);//method call
            }
        });
        if(log.isDebugEnabled())
            log.debug("submitted " + msg);
    }

    public static void stop() {
        EXEC.shutdown();
    }
}

Note: this does not need to be wrapped in a Thread.

I check if logging is enabled as generating Strings you don't need can be amazingly slower and often the simplest way to speed up an application is to avoid them.

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