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Does anybody know the best way to decrypt FreeBSD hashes? I've been running some through JTR all day now and I couldn't yield a result. Is there perhaps a way to convert a FreeBSD to a normal MD5 hash?

Here are the hashes:

$1$LW0BqrMo$7RdAC6dRWhoaSqf81WTDh.
$1$lz2DS3Vy$wxNOu1EBHrcDCYAXbiSLl1
$1$IZSaO//a$0yQcAar4HV/c0ocR7dhnR.
$1$FeUvbH85$poEAS/Nnf/vbRGTzgHtEu.
$1$bMajRVwN$PxIf0SlT16Pt/igAgHeMe1

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

Because FreeBSD is a hashing algorithm and not an encryption algorithm, you can't decrypt it: hashing is one-way.

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I acknowledge that. I was thinking, however, that if there was a way that FreeBSD could be converted into a normal md5 hash, I could look it up for collisions. Also, programs like JTR would run faster if it were in plain MD5 as opposed to FreeBSD. –  mjkaufer Oct 13 '13 at 15:37
    
I don't know a way to convert a FreeBSD hash to a MD5 hash, but if there would be a way, why? MD5 is also a hashing algorithm, you can't reverse it. –  ProgramFOX Oct 13 '13 at 16:30
    
But there are websites which decrypt md5 algorithms. The ones that do FreeBSD are few and don't work. –  mjkaufer Oct 13 '13 at 16:40
1  
They don't decrypt MD5, they're just crackers. MD5 is a broken hash algorithm, so it's easy to crack for these websites. But I don't think it's possible to convert from one hash to another. –  ProgramFOX Oct 13 '13 at 16:43

I ran your hashes through hashcat, and I got the correct original strings. They're listed here:

$1$LW0BqrMo$7RdAC6dRWhoaSqf81WTDh.:ethernets
$1$lz2DS3Vy$wxNOu1EBHrcDCYAXbiSLl1:cyptography
$1$IZSaO//a$0yQcAar4HV/c0ocR7dhnR.:bandwidths
$1$FeUvbH85$poEAS/Nnf/vbRGTzgHtEu.:domains
$1$bMajRVwN$PxIf0SlT16Pt/igAgHeMe1:symmetric

May I ask what you need them for?

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The $1$ in front of the password indicates it is using an MD5 hash. See crypt(3).

As cracker286 demonstrated, those are easy to crack. In FreeBSD 9.x at least the default is to use SHA512 instead of MD5. See login.conf.

Existing FreeBSD installations should update /etc/login.conf to switch to SHA512 password hashing and notify the users to change their passwords.

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$1$FeUvbH85$poEAS/Nnf/vbRGTzgHtEu.:domain
$1$bMajRVwN$PxIf0SlT16Pt/igAgHeMe1:ethernet
$1$IZSaO//a$0yQcAar4HV/c0ocR7dhnR.:cryptography
$1$lz2DS3Vy$wxNOu1EBHrcDCYAXbiSLl1:bandwidth
$1$LW0BqrMo$7RdAC6dRWhoaSqf81WTDh.:asymmetric
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1  
This would be a vastly more useful answer if you explained how you reached these answers. –  pjmorse Dec 30 '13 at 19:18

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