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I am a Java programmer and recently play with C for fun. Now I am learning address and pointers which are a little bit confusing for me. Here is my question. See the below two blocks of the code.

void withinArray(int * a, int size, int * ptr) {
    int x;
    printf("ptr is %d\n", ptr);
    printf("a is %d\n", a);
    printf("difference in pointers is: %d\n", ptr - a);
    x = ptr - intArray;
    printf("x is %d\n", x);
}

void doubleSize() {
  double doubArray[10];
  double * doubPtr1;
  double * doubPtr2;

  doubPtr1 = doubArray;
  doubPtr2= doubArray+1;
  int p2 = doubPtr2;
  int p1 = doubPtr1;

  printf("p2-p1 is %d\n", p2-p1);
  printf("doubPtr2-doubPtr1 is %d\n", doubPtr2-doubPtr1);
}

int main(void)
{
  int a[10];
  int *intarray = a;
  int *p = intarray + 9;

  printf(withinArray(a, 10, p));
  return 0;
}

I am wondering for function withinArray(), why we could directly get the x value, which is 9? But for the other method, we have to convert doubPtr to int first and then we can get the difference between pointers in int?

From my understanding, in doubleSize(), doubPtr2-doubPtr1 = 1 means the difference in pointer address in memory is 1. But why the withinArray() doesn't need to do so?

share|improve this question
1  
What is intArray in withinArray? – haccks Oct 13 '13 at 16:00
2  
Also, printf("%d\n", withinArray(a, 10, p)); is incorrect since withinArray() returns void. Furthermore, the type of the result of pointer subtraction is ptrdiff_t which is to be printed using %td. – user529758 Oct 13 '13 at 16:04
    
@haccks Sorry for typo, the intArray should be a here. – Emma Xu Oct 13 '13 at 21:33

A difference of 1 between two pointers means that the pointers point to adjacent units of memory of the size of the objects pointed at.

Thus, given:

int i[2];
int *ip0 = &i[0];
int *ip1 = &i[1];
double d[2];
double *dp0 = &d[0];
double *dp1 = &d[1];

we could safely write:

assert((ip1 - ip0) == (dp1 - dp0));
assert(ip1 - ip0 == 1);
assert(dp1 - dp0 == 1);

However, you could also safely write:

assert((char *)ip1 - (char *)ip0 == sizeof(int));
assert((char *)dp1 - (char *)dp0 == sizeof(double));

and usually you would find that it is safe to write:

assert(sizeof(double) != sizeof(int));

though that is not guaranteed by the standard.

Also, as Filipe Gonçalves correctly points out in his comment, the difference between two pointers is formally only defined if the pointers are of the same type and point to two elements of the same array, or point to one element beyond the end of the array. Note that standard C demands that given:

int a[100];

it is safe to generate the address int *ip = &array[100];, even though it is not safe to either read from or write to the location pointed at by ip. The value stored in ip can be used in comparisons.

You also formally cannot subtract two void * values because there is no size for the type void (which is why my example used casts to char *, not void *). Beware: GCC will not object to the subtraction of two void * values unless you include -pedantic in the options.


Do you know why the value of doubPtr2 - doubPtr1 (in my second method) is different from x = ptr - a (in my first method)?

Assuming that intArray is meant to be a, then this code:

#include <stdio.h>

static void withinArray(int *a, int *ptr)
{
    int x;
    printf("ptr is %p\n", (void *)ptr);
    printf("a   is %p\n", (void *)a);
    printf("difference in pointers is: %td\n", ptr - a);
    x = ptr - a;
    printf("x is %d\n", x);
}

static void doubleSize(void)
{
    double doubArray[10];
    double *doubPtr1 = doubArray;
    double *doubPtr2 = doubArray+1;
    int p2 = doubPtr2;
    int p1 = doubPtr1;

    printf("p1 = 0x%.8X\n", p1);
    printf("p2 = 0x%.8X\n", p2);
    printf("p2-p1 is %d\n", p2-p1);
    printf("doubPtr1 = %p\n", (void *)doubPtr1);
    printf("doubPtr1 = %p\n", (void *)doubPtr2);
    printf("doubPtr2-doubPtr1 is %td\n", doubPtr2-doubPtr1);
}

int main(void)
{
    int a[10];
    int *intarray = a;
    int *p = intarray + 9;

    withinArray(a, p);
    doubleSize();
    return 0;
}

compiles with warnings that I would ordinarily fix (change the type of p1 and p2 to uintptr_t, include <inttypes.h>, and format using "p1 = 0x%.8" PRIXPTR "\n" as the format string), and it generates the output:

ptr is 0x7fff5c5684a4
a   is 0x7fff5c568480
difference in pointers is: 9
x is 9
p1 = 0x5C5684B0
p2 = 0x5C5684B8
p2-p1 is 8
doubPtr1 = 0x7fff5c5684b0
doubPtr1 = 0x7fff5c5684b8
doubPtr2-doubPtr1 is 1

Fixed code generates:

ptr is 0x7fff5594f4a4
a   is 0x7fff5594f480
difference in pointers is: 9
x is 9
p1 = 0x7FFF5594F4B0
p2 = 0x7FFF5594F4B8
p2-p1 is 8
doubPtr1 = 0x7fff5594f4b0
doubPtr1 = 0x7fff5594f4b8
doubPtr2-doubPtr1 is 1

(The difference is in the number of hex digits printed for p1 and p2.)

I assume that your puzzlement is about why the int code prints 9 rather than, say, 36, whereas the double code prints 8 instead of 1.

The answer is that when you subtract two pointers, the result is given in units of the size of the objects pointed at (which I seem to remember saying in my opening sentence).

When you execute doubPtr2-doubPtr1, the distance returned is in units of the number of double values between the two addresses.

However, the conversion to integer loses the type information, so you effectively have the char * (or void *) addresses of the two pointers in the integer, and the byte addresses are indeed 8 apart.

If we make two symmetrical routines, the information is clearer:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <inttypes.h>

static void intSize(void)
{
    int intArray[10];
    int *intPtr1 = intArray;
    int *intPtr2 = intArray+1;
    uintptr_t p2 = (uintptr_t)intPtr2;
    uintptr_t p1 = (uintptr_t)intPtr1;

    printf("p1 = 0x%.8" PRIXPTR "\n", p1);
    printf("p2 = 0x%.8" PRIXPTR "\n", p2);
    printf("p2-p1 is %" PRIdPTR "\n", p2-p1);
    printf("intPtr1 = %p\n", (void *)intPtr1);
    printf("intPtr1 = %p\n", (void *)intPtr2);
    printf("intPtr2-intPtr1 is %td\n", intPtr2-intPtr1);
}

static void doubleSize(void)
{
    double doubArray[10];
    double *doubPtr1 = doubArray;
    double *doubPtr2 = doubArray+1;
    uintptr_t p2 = (uintptr_t)doubPtr2;
    uintptr_t p1 = (uintptr_t)doubPtr1;

    printf("p1 = 0x%.8" PRIXPTR "\n", p1);
    printf("p2 = 0x%.8" PRIXPTR "\n", p2);
    printf("p2-p1 is %" PRIdPTR "\n", p2-p1);
    printf("doubPtr1 = %p\n", (void *)doubPtr1);
    printf("doubPtr1 = %p\n", (void *)doubPtr2);
    printf("doubPtr2-doubPtr1 is %td\n", doubPtr2-doubPtr1);
}

int main(void)
{
    doubleSize();
    intSize();
    return 0;
}

Output:

p1 = 0x7FFF5C93D4B0
p2 = 0x7FFF5C93D4B8
p2-p1 is 8
doubPtr1 = 0x7fff5c93d4b0
doubPtr1 = 0x7fff5c93d4b8
doubPtr2-doubPtr1 is 1
p1 = 0x7FFF5C93D4B0
p2 = 0x7FFF5C93D4B4
p2-p1 is 4
intPtr1 = 0x7fff5c93d4b0
intPtr1 = 0x7fff5c93d4b4
intPtr2-intPtr1 is 1

Remember Polya's advice in How to Solve It:

share|improve this answer
2  
Nice answer. Just adding some info for the OP, since he's new to C: pointer arithmetic should be performed only between pointers to elements in the same array (or 1 past the end). The difference between two pointers is of type ptrdiff_t (defined in stddef.h) – Filipe Gonçalves Oct 13 '13 at 16:29
    
@FilipeGonçalves; True. The effect of subtracting one pointer from another is undefined unless both points to the element of the same array. – haccks Oct 13 '13 at 16:35
    
Thanks for letting me know that pointer arithmetic should only be performed btw pointers in the same array... A quick follow-up here, do you know why the value of doubPtr2-doubPtr1(in my second method) is different from x = ptr - intArray(in my first method)? Thanks! – Emma Xu Oct 13 '13 at 21:37
    
I've come up with my best guess as to what you mean…see if that helps. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 13 '13 at 22:11
    
@JonathanLeffler Your answer is so clear and well-organized. I appreciate your efforts for helping me out. Thanks! – Emma Xu Oct 14 '13 at 15:25

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