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I have the following piece of code:

module Main where
import Data.IORef
import qualified Data.ByteString as S
import Control.Monad
import Control.Concurrent

main :: IO ()
main = do
    var <- newIORef False
    forkIO $ forever $ do
        status <- readIORef var
        if status
            then putStrLn "main: file was read"
            else putStrLn "main: file not yet read"
        threadDelay 10000
    threadDelay 200000
    putStrLn ">>! going to read file"
    --threadDelay 200000    --
    str <- S.readFile "large2"
    putStrLn ">>! finished reading file"
    writeIORef var True
    threadDelay 200000  

I compile the code and run it like this:

$ ghc -threaded --make test.hs
$ dd if=/dev/urandom of=large bs=800000 count=1024
$ ./test +RTS -N3
<...>
main: file not yet read
main: file not yet read
main: file not yet read
main: file not yet read
>>! going to read file
>>! finished reading file
main: file was read
main: file was read
main: file was read
main: file was read
<...>

That is, the program pauses when reading a file. I find this confusing because if I replace readFile with threadDelay it yield control correctly.

What is going on in here? Isn't GHC mapping forkIO'd code to a different system thread?

(I am using Mac OS X 10.8.5, but people has reported the same behavior on Ubuntu and Debian)

share|improve this question
    
Lazy IO. It's not actually reading a file, it prints those two lines immediately. –  swish Oct 13 '13 at 17:18
2  
swish: That's not the case here. This is strict IO. It's Data.Bytestring.readFile. There is a noticeable pause when running the program. –  Jake McArthur Oct 13 '13 at 17:29
    
It seems that RTS sheduler runs these green-threads in one bound-thread. Just curious: what about forkOS? –  alvelcom Oct 13 '13 at 17:42
2  
alvelcom: A bound thread as created by forkOS doesn't guarantee to make a new OS thread, just to always run safe calls in the same OS thread consistently. You cannot necessarily use forkOS to claim a dedicated OS thread. –  Jake McArthur Oct 13 '13 at 18:06
    
On some runs I get the same behavior as the OP, however about 50% of the time the program behaves as expected. There appears to be something interesting happening here. –  John L Oct 14 '13 at 0:44
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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Jake is right.

I believe that the large allocation is triggering a garbage collection, but the collection itself cannot commence until all threads are ready.

When you have problems like this, you can look at what is going on by using ThreadScope.

The eventlog from your code looks like this:

img non-chunked.png

The problem is we want to give the other thread a chance to run. So instead of using S.readFile, we use a chunked read and accumulate the result (or a lazy bytestring). Such as:

readChunky filename = withFile filename ReadMode $ \x -> do
  go x S.empty
  where
    go h acc = do
      more <- hIsEOF h
      case more of
        True  -> return acc
        False -> do
          v <- S.hGet h (4096 * 4096)
          go h $ S.append acc v

And it works as intended.

See the graph: See the graph.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, just by looking at threadscope screenshots, I see that garbage collection is performed roughly at the same time in both cases, apart from the few GC calls in the second picture. How can one derive a theory about GC blocking the second thread just by looking at those pictures? –  Daniil Oct 16 '13 at 17:16
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I've developed a theory. I believe that the large allocation is triggering a garbage collection, but the collection itself cannot commence until all threads are ready. All threads but the one reading the file block until the read has completed, but unfortunately the entire read happens in one call, so it takes a while. Then the GC is performed, and everything is fine after.

I also have a workaround, but I don't think it guarantees that the program won't block (although I have not gotten it to block yet, others have reported that it still blocks on their machines). Run the following with +RTS -N -qg (if you allow parallel GC it sometimes blocks, but not always):

module Main where

import Data.IORef
import qualified Data.ByteString as S
import Control.Monad
import Control.Concurrent

main :: IO ()
main = do
  done <- newEmptyMVar
  forkIO $ do
    var <- newIORef False
    forkIO $ forever $ do
      status <- readIORef var
      if status
        then putStrLn "main: file was read"
        else putStrLn "main: file not yet read"
      threadDelay 10000
    threadDelay 200000
    putStrLn ">>! going to read file"
    --threadDelay 200000    --
    _str <- S.readFile "large"
    putStrLn ">>! finished reading file"
    writeIORef var True
    threadDelay 200000
    putMVar done ()
  takeMVar done

I have no theories yet about why the GC is waiting for the syscall. I can't seem to replicate the issue with my own safe and unsafe bindings to sleep and adding performGC to the status loop.

share|improve this answer
    
if there are any foreign calls using the unsafe ffi rather than the safe ffi, that can block GC –  Carter Tazio Schonwald Oct 14 '13 at 3:24
    
I think you are on the right track. Couldn't reproduce the bug on windows until I tried a 2gb file, where the program will just go OOM as soon as it tries to read the file. –  MdxBhmt Oct 14 '13 at 3:24
add comment

I don't think it's readFile so much as underlying ByteString operations. There are a couple of unsafe FFI calls in Data.ByteString.Internal:

foreign import ccall unsafe "string.h strlen" c_strlen
    :: CString -> IO CSize

foreign import ccall unsafe "static stdlib.h &free" c_free_finalizer
    :: FunPtr (Ptr Word8 -> IO ())

foreign import ccall unsafe "string.h memchr" c_memchr
    :: Ptr Word8 -> CInt -> CSize -> IO (Ptr Word8)

foreign import ccall unsafe "string.h memcmp" c_memcmp
    :: Ptr Word8 -> Ptr Word8 -> CSize -> IO CInt

foreign import ccall unsafe "string.h memcpy" c_memcpy
    :: Ptr Word8 -> Ptr Word8 -> CSize -> IO (Ptr Word8)

foreign import ccall unsafe "string.h memset" c_memset
    :: Ptr Word8 -> CInt -> CSize -> IO (Ptr Word8)

foreign import ccall unsafe "static fpstring.h fps_reverse" c_reverse
    :: Ptr Word8 -> Ptr Word8 -> CULong -> IO ()

foreign import ccall unsafe "static fpstring.h fps_intersperse" c_intersperse
    :: Ptr Word8 -> Ptr Word8 -> CULong -> Word8 -> IO ()

foreign import ccall unsafe "static fpstring.h fps_maximum" c_maximum
    :: Ptr Word8 -> CULong -> IO Word8

foreign import ccall unsafe "static fpstring.h fps_minimum" c_minimum
    :: Ptr Word8 -> CULong -> IO Word8

foreign import ccall unsafe "static fpstring.h fps_count" c_count
    :: Ptr Word8 -> CULong -> Word8 -> IO CULong

These unsafe calls are faster than safe calls (there is little overhead for each call), but they will block the Haskell run-time system (including threads) until they complete.

I'm not 100% positive this is the reason you see the delay, but it was the first thing that came to my mind.

share|improve this answer
    
I looked at the implementation of readFile, but lost interest somewhere in GHC's IO modules. My suspicion is the same as yours, that there is some unsafe FFI binding somewhere, but I don't think it's necessarily something in the bytestring library itself. Perhaps it is a system call that was never expected to be used on large inputs or something. –  Jake McArthur Oct 13 '13 at 18:03
    
I think memcpy or something similar might be the culprit. –  Gabriel Gonzalez Oct 13 '13 at 18:07
2  
readFile uses createAndTrim internally, which can call memcpy (although I don't see why it would in these circumstances). Another likely culprit is mallocPlainForeignPtrBytes / newPinnedByteArray#. –  Mikhail Glushenkov Oct 13 '13 at 18:19
3  
Unsafe FFI calls do not block the entire Haskell runtime. They block the capability from which the call was made, which is essentially the same as blocking 1 core. –  John L Oct 14 '13 at 0:32
3  
Sorry, forgot to include the link to community.haskell.org/~simonmar/papers/conc-ffi.pdf, which is invaluable for understanding FFI/concurrency in Haskell. –  John L Oct 14 '13 at 0:45
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