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I am relying on a std::vector to hold a large number of Eigen::MatrixXd. Not being a C++ expert, I find myself wondering what is the best way to properly manage memory allocation with this type of structure. Particularly, my question is, using it as a class member, how do I free the allocated memory in the class destructor?

using std::vector; using Eigen::MatrixXd;

Class myClass{
    //...
    vector<MatrixXd> container;

    //...
    myClass();
    ~myClass();
}

Constructor & destructor of myClass:

myClass::myClass(){
    //...
    container=vector<MatrixXd>(100);
    for (int i=0; i<container.size(); i++) container[i]=MatrixXd::Zero(100,100);
    //...
}

myClass::-myClass(){
    //...
    for (int i=0; i<container.size(); i++) container[i].resize(0,0);
    container.clear();
    //...
}

Is it enough to just call clear(), as I already resized the Eigen matrices to (0,0), or do I need to used delete? And is there any advantage on using vector<MatriXd*> instead?

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1  
std::vector will destroy its elements when it goes out of scope. However, you will have to deallocate memory yourself if you are storing pointers in std::vector –  Kunal Oct 13 '13 at 17:48
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You do not need to do anything special. This should do :

class myClass{
public:
    //...
    vector<MatrixXd> container;

    //...
    myClass();
    ~myClass();
};

myClass::myClass() : container(100, MatrixXd(100,100)){
}

myClass::-myClass(){
}

The above code creates vector of 100 elements in the constructor, and all is released when the object goes out of scope in the destructor.


And is there any advantage on using vector instead?

Not really. By doing that, you'll just complicate your code more then you need to.

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But what about the memory allocated for the Matrices? I used the value 100 just as an example, in practice it is not really known at compile time (I have some overloaded constructors that taken on different arguments). I remember reading somewhere in the Eigen foruns that I should resize the matrices to (0,0) to free the allocated memory (forum.kde.org/viewtopic.php?f=74&t=87242) –  joaocandre Oct 13 '13 at 18:16
    
@joaocandre The myClass's destructor is going to destroy the vector, which will call MatrixXd's destructor of all elements, and that will take care of memory. That guy wanted to release the memory before the object goes out of scope. In the destructor, the object of myClass is already out of scope –  BЈовић Oct 13 '13 at 18:22
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Destructor of MatrixXd as the item type will be called during destructing std::vector. So don't worry about deleting them. std::vector::~vector():

Destructs the container. The destructors of the elements are called and the used storage is deallocated. Note, that if the elements are pointers, the pointed-to objects are not destroyed.

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The whole point of good design of classes in C++ is that when you destruct them, they properly release the resources they hold. Since both std::vector and MatrixXd are designed correctly, you don't need to do anything at all. Your destructor can be empty.

This is the big mental leap that you absolutely must do when going from C to C++. In C++, a class is considered decently made if you can simply destruct it without any further ado. The fact that a class is destructible should be an invariant - at all points in time while a class instance exists, said instance should be destructible. When you destruct the class, it should release all of the resources it holds.

Failure to release resources is the source of endless grief in the C-style design where you don't leverage C++ the way it was meant to be used.

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