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I am trying to create an object with setters and getters, and this is my code:

var Player = function(height){
    var _height = height;

    Object.defineProperty(this, 'height', {
      enumerable: false
    , configurable: true
    , writable: false
    , get: function(){return _height;}
    , set: function(val){_height = val;}
    });
}

var myPlayer = new Player(10);

Even though the writable property of the defineProperty options is set to false, I get the following error:

Invalid property. A property cannot both have accessors and be writable or have a value, #<Object>

The same is happening when the writable is set to true of course, but the error disappears if I remove the writable line.

Am I doing something wrong, or is this a bug? This is happening on Google Chrome, Version 30.0.1599.66

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1  
Error seems descriptive... Why would you have a getter and setter for a non-writable property? –  elclanrs Oct 13 '13 at 19:29
    
The error is getting displayed in both cases, writable: true and writable: false. Isn't this weird? –  Loupax Oct 13 '13 at 19:44
1  
You can only either have the attributes writable and value or get and set, not any mixture of them. Since you specify writable , you cannot use get or set. See Mozilla MDN –  Ingo Bürk Oct 13 '13 at 19:46
    
Oh, it makes sense then. This comment should be an answer so I can accept it –  Loupax Oct 13 '13 at 19:47
    
Just wrote one. ;) –  Ingo Bürk Oct 13 '13 at 19:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The Mozilla MDN for Object.defineProperty clarifies this:

"Property descriptors present in objects come in two main flavors: data descriptors and accessor descriptors. A data descriptor is a property that has a value, which may or may not be writable. An accessor descriptor is a property described by a getter-setter pair of functions. A descriptor must be one of these two flavors; it cannot be both."

This means, that you can use either one of those:

  • writable and value
  • get and set

But you cannot use any combination of them. In your example, you specify the writable attribute, which means that it is a data descriptor, which disallows get and set attributes.

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