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I'm trying to make a function on a list of arbitrary type, and do some computation, storing the intermediate results in an STArray. Basically, I want to do something like this (yes, this is a silly example):

import Control.Monad.ST
import Data.Array.ST

echoArray :: [a] -> [[a]]
echoArray input = runST $ do
    let n = length input
    buf <- newListArray (0, n-1) $ map (\x->[x]) input :: ST s (STArray s Int [a])
    getElems buf

However, ghci (version 7.4.2) gives this spectacular error:

x.hs:7:12:
Couldn't match type `a' with `a1'
  `a' is a rigid type variable bound by
      the type signature for echoArray :: [a] -> [[a]] at x.hs:5:1
  `a1' is a rigid type variable bound by
       an expression type signature: ST s1 (STArray s1 Int [a1])
       at x.hs:7:12
Expected type: ST s (STArray s Int [a1])
  Actual type: ST s (STArray s Int [a])
In a stmt of a 'do' block:
  buf <- newListArray (0, n - 1) $ map (\ x -> [x]) input ::
           ST s (STArray s Int [a])
In the second argument of `($)', namely
  `do { let n = length input;
        buf <- newListArray (0, n - 1) $ map (\ x -> [...]) input ::
                 ST s (STArray s Int [a]);
        getElems buf }'

If I remove the type signature (":: ST s..."), I still get a different error:

x.hs:7:12:
No instance for (MArray a0 [a] (ST s))
  arising from a use of `newListArray'
Possible fix:
  add an instance declaration for (MArray a0 [a] (ST s))
In the expression: newListArray (0, n - 1)
In a stmt of a 'do' block:
  buf <- newListArray (0, n - 1) $ map (\ x -> [x]) input
In the second argument of `($)', namely
  `do { let n = length input;
        buf <- newListArray (0, n - 1) $ map (\ x -> [x]) input;
        getElems buf }'

If I instead change three occurrences of "a" to, say, Char, then of course I can compile it. But I want a generic function that can be used for [Int], [Char], [Int->Int], or whatever.

How can I do it? Thanks!

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Maybe you need to add NoMonomorphismRestriction language pragma? –  Ilya Rezvov Oct 13 '13 at 19:48
    
@Илья Резвов No, that wouldn't help here, unfortunately. –  Daniel Wagner Oct 13 '13 at 19:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem here is that the type variable a in the buf <- line isn't actually the same a as in the echoArray :: [a] -> [[a]] line! You can fix this by turning on ScopedTypeVariables and writing

echoArray :: forall a. [a] -> [[a]]

which will put a in scope at the type level inside the body of echoArray.

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Great! Thanks a lot, that fixed it, but it somehow feels like... black magic. Isn't all Haskell type signatures "universally quantified" by default? Why does adding "forall a" suddenly changes the scope of a? –  jick Oct 14 '13 at 4:26
    
@jick Yep, the variable a is universally quantified both before and after adding forall. As you say, the only difference is scoping, rather than what kind of quantification is involved. As for why forall is the keyword to use to control scoping, well, that's to avoid adding too many keywords to the language. =) –  Daniel Wagner Oct 14 '13 at 9:26

So basically, you wish that you could declare the right hand side of buf as ST s (STArray s Int [a]), but if you did it this way, then a would be a new type variable that is independent of the a in the signature of echoArray. But you want it to be the same as that a.

You could use ScopedTypeVariables, as @DanielWagner showed.

But there is a way to do it without using ScopedTypeVariables or forall.

The signature of a function allows you to establish the relationship between the parameters and result types. So instead of using a signature to constrain the type on a "result", use a signature to constrain the type on a function whose parameters somehow also contain the type a. Then let type inference to establish the connection. This is one solution to your case:

echoArray :: [a] -> [[a]]
echoArray input = runST $ do
    let n = length input
    buf <- newSTListArray (0, n-1) $ map (\x->[x]) input
    getElems buf
  where newSTListArray :: (Ix i) => (i,i) -> [a] -> ST s (STArray s i a)
        newSTListArray = newListArray

You can see that:

  1. newSTListArray is simply defined as newListArray, so from a computational point of view it is useless. However, it serves to make the type more specific.
  2. No ScopedTypeVariables or forall was used. The a in the signature of newSTListArray is not explicitly tied to the a in the signature of echoArray, but it is forced to be the same through inference. The reason that this works and your code didn't was that the a in your signature was alone, whereas here the a in the result type is tied to the a in a parameter type.
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