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I'm currently validating input and returning errors in a "fat controller" as follows:

class SomeController
{
    public function register()
    {
        // validate input
        $username = isset($_POST['username']) && strlen($_POST['username']) <= 20 ? $_POST['username'] : null;

        // proceed if validation passed
        if (isset($username)) {
            $user = $this->model->build('user');
            if ($user->insert($username)) {
                $_SESSION['success'] = 'User created!';
            } else {
                $_SESSION['error'] = 'Could not register user.';
            }
        } else {
            $_SESSION['failed']['username'] = 'Your username cannot be greater than 20 characters.';
        }

        // load appropriate view here
    }
}

class SomeModel
{
    public function insert($username)
    {
        // sql for insertion
        // ...

        return $result;
    }
}

While this works and is easy enough for me to implement, I understand that this is incorrect because the validation belongs in the model, which I'm attempting to correct using a "fat model" as follows:

class SomeController
{
    public function register()
    {
        $user = $this->model->build('user');
        $user->insert($_POST['username']);

        // load appropriate view here
        // ...
    }
}

class SomeModel
{
    public function insert($username)
    {
        // validate input
        $error = false;
        $username = trim($username) != '' && strlen($username) <= 20 ? $username : null;

        // proceed if validation passed
        if (isset($username)) {
            // sql for insertion
            // ...

            $_SESSION['success'] = 'User created!';
        } else {
            // store error in session
            $error = true;
            $_SESSION['error']['username'] = 'Your username cannot be greater than 20 characters ';
        }

        return $error ? false : true;
    }
}

The problem I see here is that the model is supposed to be portable, in that it should never need to change. But if the requirement for the length of $username changes, then obviously I'll have to alter my model.

I feel like this may be a really common question but I've yet to find a straight-forward answer. Without implementing any extra "layers", "mappers" or whatever other confusing terms are out there, how could the example pseudo-code provided be modified to correctly handle this transaction? (eg, validate input, return error if validation fails)?

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1  
If you want a simple one-class solution, then it kinda depends on the your RDBMS choice. In oracle or postgresql you can set a CONSTRAINT on the username field for the table. Violation of data integrity in database would throw an exception. Unfortunately I am not sure if there is any simple way to do the same in mysql. That said, I must ask one thing: where the hell did you hear that "model should not change"? Because that's BS. –  tereško Oct 14 '13 at 1:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Without implementing any extra "layers", "mappers" or whatever

You should consider the "model" to be a application layer rather than a single class. The term "layer" could be thought of as a simple way to reference the M slice of MVC sandwich. So to accomplish the flexibility you desire you will need to create it.

A number of clear seperations can be made. I would consider having three abstractions: services, data mappers and entities.

A service would be exposed to the controller and perform the service being requested.

// some controller
function register() {
  $service = $this->getUserService();
  $user = $service->register($_POST['first_name'], $_POST['last_name']);
  if ($user instanceof \My\Entity\User) {
    // set user in view
  } else {
    // redirect to error
  }
}

So task one complete, the controller is now dumb to whatever happens within register, all it wants to know is how to resolve the appropriate result. If there is a user object, success, otherwise false something went wrong.

The service class itself would encapsulate the services being offered:

// class UserService.php
function register($firstname, $lastname) {
  // validate arguments
  if ($this->isValidUsername(....
    $userMapper = $this->getUserMapper();
    $user = new My\Entity\User();
    $user->setFirstName($firstname);
    $user->setLastName($lastname);
    return $userMapper-save($user);
  }
  return false;
}

We handle the validation of the arguments and also create the new user, passing it to the data mapper which will perform the "actual save" abstracting the database operations.

// UserMapper
function save($user) {
  // save $user to db
  $sql = 'INSERT INTO ....

 return true;
}
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So basically you only use the Controller to control the application layer? Which means that form validation should be handled by the application layer also? (Checking names, uniqueness, accepted terms, etc). That means Controller would only pass the data of the form through, right? –  Kid Diamond Aug 27 at 0:33

I'm not sure what you would consider to be an undesirable "layer" or "mapper". This is an interesting question, and my first though was that you could just include a configuration file that defined a constant for your username length. My second though was that you could have someModel extend a class or implement an interface, wherein you values would be set as properties or constants. I suspect that you have thought of these, and are avoiding them; that this is what you mean by avoiding "layers" and "mappers" It seems that you are being guided by these principals in this code:

  • Avoid "magic numbers"
  • KISS
  • Composition over inheritance
  • skinny controller/fat model

So, are you running php5.4+ ? Maybe define a trait which could be used in this and other models that defines the username length and other changeable values in the application. Or maybe that too is to much of a "layer"?

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