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so I want really benefit from script# and get maximum from it. I understand that target of S# is JS but I definetely want to use it in .NET also, why? Check the scenario.

I have 3 projects - .NET dll, S#, WebApp. Suppose I want to create validator and helper functions in my WebApp so a lot of staff can be done on client side. BUt the same thing like validation should done on the server side. Same for helpers which can be used on client side and some business logic can be used in .NET. This will help to avoid a lot of code duplication.

I was able to share and run very simple methods in .NET and JS. But when I am using some .NET specific things like Math.Random I am not able to use it on server side and get "Method not found exception"

The second thing I really would like to have is to mark some methods and properties to appear in .NET but skip in JS. There is something like Nonscriptable attribute but seems that does not work.

Thanks!

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too broad question!! –  Deepak Oct 14 '13 at 0:05
    
Nothing broad I think. the main issue when I try to call a method in S# from.NET which used Math.Random it throws exception but works well in JS. WHY? –  Armen Oct 14 '13 at 17:55
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1 Answer

What you are trying to do is code sharing between S# and C#. This functionality is limited to the C# 2.0 spec. You will only be able to use signatures that are common to both. For instance start out by defining a class and share it in both - even then you'll notice that there are some limitations because S# doesn't support operator overloading in the .NET sense. Hopefully S# will catch up to the latest C# spec in the next year.

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