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Good evening,

I'm doing an assignment for an introductory java class that requires me to use switch and try statements to validate user input. The user of the java application should enter a number associated with a data type (1 - string, 2 - integer, 3 - double, or 4 - quit). That number should be validated, but the validation process always throws and exception no matter if the data is valid or not. After doing this, this user is supposed to be able to enter data and have the application validate that said entered data is indeed of the selected data type. Given I keep running into a thrown exception, I haven't even been able to test this portion of the code, but am certain it won't work given I see three unused variables that, according to my text, should be used (strTryString, strTryInt, and strTryDouble). I can't make the connection mentally of how, upon initial selection of a data type, the program will then say "user selected double, compare input[strTryDouble?] to parameters of double data type". Any help with this would be greatly appreciated. Here is what I have thus far:

import java.io.*;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

public class MyType
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        // declare class variables
        String strChoice, strTryString, strTryInt, StrTryDouble;
        int choice, tryInt;
        double tryDouble;
        boolean done = false;

        // loop while not done
        while(!done)
        {
            try
            {
                strChoice = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null, "What's my type\n\n\n1) String\n2) integer\n3) double\n4) Quit the program");

                choice = Integer.parseInt(JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,strChoice));

                switch(choice)
                {
                    case 1:
                        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Correct, any input can be saved as a String.");
                        break;

                    case 2:
                        tryInt = Integer.parseInt(strTryInt);
                        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Correct.");
                        break;

                    case 3:
                        tryDouble = Double.parseDouble(strTryDouble);
                        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Correct.");
                        break;

                    case 4:
                        done = true;
                        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "The program will now close.");
                        break;

                    default:
                        throw new NumberFormatException();
                }
            }
            catch(NumberFormatException e)
            {
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,"Please enter a 1, 2, 3, or 4.","Error",JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);
            }
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  • strTryDouble was uppercased (StrTryDouble) in the declaration.
  • Input and parsing were a bit unclear.

The following works for me (JDK 6; changed lines marked /***/):

import java.io.*;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

public class MyType
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        // declare class variables
        String strChoice, strTryString, strTryInt, strTryDouble; /***/
        int choice, tryInt;
        double tryDouble;
        boolean done = false;
        boolean ok; /***/

        // loop while not done
        while(!done)
        {
            try
            {
                strChoice = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null, "What's my type\n\n\n1) String\n2) integer\n3) double\n4) Quit the program");

                choice = Integer.parseInt(strChoice); /***/

                switch(choice)
                {
                    case 1:
                        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Correct, any input can be saved as a String.");
                        break;

                    case 2:
                        strTryInt = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,"Enter an integer"); /***/
                        ok = true;
                        try { /***/
                          tryInt = Integer.parseInt(strTryInt);
                        } catch(NumberFormatException e) { /***/
                          ok = false;     /***/
                        }
                        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, ok?"Correct.":"Not an integer"); /***/
                        break;

                    case 3:
                        strTryDouble = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,"Enter a double"); /***/
                        tryDouble = Double.parseDouble(strTryDouble);
                        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Correct.");
                        break;

                    case 4:
                        done = true;
                        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "The program will now close.");
                        break;

                    default:
                        throw new NumberFormatException();
                }
            }
            catch(NumberFormatException e)
            {
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,"Please enter a 1, 2, 3, or 4.","Error",JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);
            }
        }
    }
}

To get the choice of type, JOptionPane.showInputDialog returns the string from the user, then Integer.parseInt parses it.

To get the value, you use the same pattern: get a string, then parse it. Getting the string within each case takes care of the uninitialized variables.

In case 2, I have added an example of how to check whether it was actually an integer and then proceed with code. In general, you can catch the exception and set a flag (ok) to process on. I only use this when the exceptions are how a function reports a normal condition (e.g., bad user input); for real errors, I let the exception propagate to a higher-level catch block.

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Here's a more efficient and perfect solution to your problem:

import java.io.*;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;

public class MyType
{
public static void main(String[] args)
{
    // declare class variables
    String strChoice=""; // you didn't need the other variables
    Integer choice, tryInt;
    double tryDouble;
    boolean done = false;

    // loop while not done
    while(!done)
    {
        try
        {
            strChoice = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null, "What's my type\n\n\n1) String\n2) integer\n3) double\n4) Quit the program");

            if(strChoice.equals("")) // refuses blank answers, must enter a choice
            {
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,"Please enter a 1, 2, 3, or 4.","Error",JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);
                continue;
            }

            choice = Integer.parseInt(strChoice);
            if(choice !=4)  // so the input dialog doesn't appear when choice is 4
            strChoice = JOptionPane.showInputDialog(null,strChoice);




            switch(choice)
            {
                case 1:
                    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Correct, any input can be saved as a String.");
                    break;

                case 2:
                    tryInt = Integer.parseInt(strChoice);
                    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Correct.");
                    break;

                case 3:
                    tryDouble = Double.parseDouble(strChoice);
                    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Correct.");
                    break;

                case 4:
                    done = true;
                    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "The program will now close.");
                    break;

                default:
                {   if((choice > 4) || (choice == null)) // must be 1 - 4, & not blank
                    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,"Please enter a 1, 2, 3, or 4.","Error",JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);

                }
            }
        }
        catch(NumberFormatException e) // this should ONLY occur when type is wrong
        {
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null,"Your input can't be stored into that type.","Error",JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);
        }
    }
}
}

Also, in the cases, you are supposed to parse strChoice, not choice. choice is was already converted to an int before, so it wouldn't be a good comparison. Using strString truly compares the user input against the type.

I also changed int to Integer, int is a primitive data type and can't be checked for null values. Integer can do all that int can, but it's an object, and objects can be null. If choice happens to be null we can check for it and do something about it.

While the answer you accepted is not wrong, the code is too repetitive (not a good programming practice), and is a great departure from your original code. There were exceptions when the 'error' message didn't fit the description of what really was wrong. Also, the program got a lot more complex: in programming simpler is better.

Hope this helps! Let me know if you have any questions!

Cheers! :)

JLL

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