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I have written a program that manipulates files and I sometimes to delete a file. So I searched and found the remove() function in the stdio header file in C.

The problem is that sometimes works and sometimes not. Sometimes the file is deleted, other perror() shows a message that says permission denied but I have not specified any special permissions on the file. As a matter of fact the file has been created a little before by another function. Any special conditions that I have to consider?

Here is the load function that creates the file:

...
int loadF ( const char *filename, plist_t pl, int size, int createFlag ) {
    FILE *pFile = NULL;
    pnode_t pn = NULL;
    int fsize;
    int total;
    int i;

    // Get file stream.
    pFile = fopen ( filename, "rb" );
    if ( !pFile ) { // File does not exist.
        if ( createFlag ) {
            if ( !createF ( filename ) ) {
                return 0;   // fail
            }
        } else {    // abort
            perror ( "loadF:fopen" );
            return 0;
        }
    }

    // Confirm that we have opened the file stream.
    if ( !pFile ) {
        pFile = fopen ( filename, "rb" );
        if ( !pFile ) {
            perror ( "loadF:fopen:" );
            return 0;
        }
    }

    // Check if list has not been initialized.
    if ( pl == NULL ) {
        fclose ( pFile );
        pFile = NULL;
        return 0;   // abort
    }

    // Get the size of the file.
    fseek ( pFile, 0, SEEK_END );
    fsize = ftell ( pFile );
    rewind ( pFile );

    // Check if the file is empty.
    if ( !fsize ) {
        fclose ( pFile );
        pFile = NULL;
        return 1;   // No data to load, continue.
    }

    // Get the total number of structures in the file.
    total = fsize / size;

    // Allocate memory for a node to transfer data.
    pn = (pnode_t) malloc ( sizeof (node_t) * sizeof (char) );
    if ( !pn ) {
        fclose ( pFile );
        pFile = NULL;
        perror ( "loadF:malloc" );
        return 0;
    }

    // Copy from file to list every structure.
    for ( i = 1; i <= total; i++ ) {
        if ( feof ( pFile ) ) {
            printf ( "OUT!" );
            break;
        }
        printf ( "g" );
        fread ( pn->key, size, 1, pFile );
        printf ( "f\n" );
        if ( ferror ( pFile ) ) {
            fclose ( pFile );
            pFile = NULL;
            perror ( "loadF:fread" );
            return 0;
        }
        addfirst ( pl, pn->key ); // Maybe we have to allocate memory with malloc every time?
        // Debug with a for loop in the nodes of the list to see if data are OK.
        printf ( "cid = %d\n", pl->head->key->card.cid );
        printf ( "limit = %5.2f\n", pl->head->key->card.limit );
        printf ( "balance = %5.2f\n", pl->head->key->card.balance );
    }

    // Close the stream.
    if ( pFile ) {
        fclose ( pFile );
        pFile = NULL;
    }

    // Deallocate transfer memory.
    if ( pn ) {
        free ( pn );
    }

    // Exit
    return 1;
}

And here is the function that uses remove:

int saveF ( const char *filename, plist_t pl, int size ) {
    FILE *pFile = NULL;     // Pointer to the file structure.
    pnode_t pn = NULL;      // Pointer to a node of a list.


    // Delete the specified file - on success it returns 0.
    if ( remove (filename) == -1 ) {
        perror ( "saveF:remove" );
        return 0;
    }

    // Re-create the file (but now is empty).
    if ( !createF (filename) ) {
        return 0;
    }

    // Get the file stream.
    pFile = fopen ( filename, "ab" );
    if ( !pFile ) {
        perror ( "saveF:fopen" );
        return 0;
    }

    // Check if list is not empty.
    if ( isEmpty ( pl ) ) {
        fclose ( pFile );
        pFile = NULL;
        return 0;           // Abort
    }

    // Traverse the list nodes and save the entity that the key points to.
    for ( pn = pl->head; pn != NULL; pn = pn->next ) {
        fwrite ( (pccms_t)(pn->key), size, 1, pFile );
        if ( ferror ( pFile ) ) {
            fclose ( pFile );
            pFile = NULL;
            perror ( "saveF:fwrite" );
            return 0;
        }
    }

    // Close the stream.
    if ( pFile ) {
        fclose ( pFile );
        pFile = NULL;
    }

    // Exit
    return 1;
}

I use Windows XP.

share|improve this question
    
Fixed the problem, a function left the pfile pointer to the file sometimes open. Thanks for your answers. –  Ponty Dec 20 '09 at 11:08
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! When you've received a good answer to your question, please "accept" the most helpful answer by clicking on the checkbox outline to the left of the answer. This indicates that you've received an answer that worked for you. Doing this helps increase your reputation on the site. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 20 '09 at 23:00

4 Answers 4

You haven't specified the platform you are using, but on Windows, the file shouldn't be open when you try to delete it. (Things work a bit differently on Unix-style systems and a delete is almost always possible even if the file is open.)

share|improve this answer

Case that you can't remove file can also depends on the file is locked by another process. In your situation it could be your function creating files. It also depends on the platform you use. If it's Win, try to use Unlocker and than check what's up with it.

share|improve this answer

There are 3 reasons in my opinion:

  1. You don't have permission to delete the file.
  2. The file is in use by another function.
  3. You have to have writing persmissions in the directory that this file is located.
share|improve this answer

Do I understand you: You create a file in line 5 and then in line 7 you delete it.

If yes: try setting a small pause between those lines, 100 ms should be OK. Or: the file is still open. Close it and try deleting it then.

share|improve this answer
    
how to delay in c? is there a delay () function ? –  Ponty Dec 20 '09 at 10:51

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