Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need some help. I want to compute ax given real value a and positive value integer x.

My program:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
int a, x;

cout << "Input a: ";
cin  >> a;
cout << "Input x: ";
cin  >> x;

for (int i=0; i<=x; i++)
    a= a*a;
    cout << "The answer is: " << a;
}
share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Mitch Wheat, Kerrek SB, Cheesebaron, JB., Ilya Oct 14 '13 at 13:42

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Mitch Wheat, Kerrek SB, Cheesebaron, JB., Ilya
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
I want to produce the output of this program, What stops you from using a compiler for that? –  Hanky 웃 Panky Oct 14 '13 at 5:47
4  
Hint: your loop is iterating over the wrong range –  Paul R Oct 14 '13 at 5:47
    
Do you need to use a for loop? Consider using std::pow or math.h –  Sambuca Oct 14 '13 at 5:49

4 Answers 4

Take a look at this loop:

for (int i=0; i<=x; i++)
    a= a*a;
    cout << "The answer is: " << a;
}

Every time you go through this loop, you multiply a by itself. Let's suppose the user enters number a0. Then:

  • After 0 iterations, a has value a0.
  • After 1 iteration, a has value a02
  • After 2 iterations, a has value a04
  • After 3 iterations, a has value a08
  • ...

For example, if a = 2 and x = 4, the values will be 2, 4, 16, and 256, which are way bigger than you want them to be.

To fix this, try changing your loop so that you have a secondary variable, initially set to 1, that you keep multiplying by a. That way, you don't change what value you're multiplying by on each iteration.

Next, note that your loop is running too many times. Since you loop up to and including x, your loop runs x + 1 times, so if you want to compute ax you will get the wrong value. Try changing this to loop exactly x times.

Finally, your print statement runs on each iteration, so you'll see all the intermediary values. Change the code so that the print statement is outside the loop.

After doing all that, do look up the pow function. If this is for an assignment you might not be able to use this function, but it's the easiest way to solve this problem.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
If implemented correctly squaring the value is actually more efficient. Whenever the exponent is divisible by two, one can square the value, e.g. a^6 = (a^2)^3 = (a^2) * (a^2)^2. I'm not sure if that was the intent in the question. –  dornhege Oct 14 '13 at 9:08
    
@dornhege- Definitely. I figured this wasn't the time to introduce exponentiation by squaring, though. :-) –  templatetypedef Oct 14 '13 at 16:27

There are a couple of errors:

for (int i=0; i<=x; i++)

this will loop for x+1 times, not what you intended.

a= a*a;

every time you do this, a is the value that is already multiplied, so you need another variable to store the result.

int result = 1;
for (int i=0; i<x; i++)
    result *= a;  
}
cout << "The answer is: " << result;

One last note, to calculate a^x, int may be too small for many practical cases, consider a bigger type like long long.

share|improve this answer
    int result = 1;
        for (int i=1; i<=x; i++)
        {
          result= result*a;
        }

            cout << "The answer is: " << result;
        }

Hope This will work for you

share|improve this answer
    
You probably want to output result at the end, not a... –  Henno Oct 14 '13 at 7:56

A more "fun" method would be to use a template:

template<unsigned int E>
unsigned int power(unsigned int i)
{
    return i * power<E - 1>(i); // template "loop"
}

template<>
unsigned int power<0>(unsigned int i) // break the "loop"
{
    return 1;
}

To get the result:

unsigned int result = power<5>(3);

I thought it obvious, but just for clarification: This method requires that you know the exponent at compile-time.

Since std::pow exists, it is a bit silly to use a loop, but it can be done:

unsigned int base = SOME_BASE;
unsigned int exponent = SOME_EXPONENT;
unsigned int result = 1;
for (int i = 0; i < exponent; result *= base, ++i);
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't work. The inputs in the question are determined at run time, not at compile time. –  dornhege Oct 14 '13 at 9:05
    
@dornhege One of the inputs is determined at compile time (the exponent). The base can be determined at runtime. And since it is rather silly to compute powers using a loop (when std::pow exists), this was just a different approach to the silly question. –  Zac Howland Oct 14 '13 at 20:06
1  
@dornhege: Sure it works ... biiiig switch statement ... ducks-and-runs. –  bitmask Oct 14 '13 at 20:47

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.