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I have a strange problem with subprocess.CalledProcessError when running my Django-project on a production server running Apache:

My code (UPDATE: added catch-all-exception handling - behaviour is unchanged) is as follows:

try:
    command_string = 'gcc -O0 -g3 -Wall -c -fmessage-length=0 ' + cfile + ' -o ' + ofile
    compile_result = subprocess.check_output(command_string,stderr=subprocess.STDOUT,shell=True)
    #logger.warning(compile_result)
    if compile_result != "": #Dann gab es einen Fehler bzw. ein Compiler-Warning --> Abbruch!
        self.ausgabe = u"Compile:\n"
        self.ausgabe += unicode(compile_result, "utf-8")
        return
except subprocess.CalledProcessError as e:
    self.ausgabe = u"Compilierfehler (Returncode {0}):\n".format(e.returncode)
    self.ausgabe += unicode(e.output, "utf-8")
    logger.error("CPE" + unicode(e.returncode, "utf-8") + unicode(e.output, "utf-8"))
    return #die weiteren Schritte müssen gar nicht erst ausgeführt werden...
except:
    logger.error(str(sys.exc_info()))
    self.ausgabe = u"Compilieren nicht erfolgreich. Fehler:\n" + unicode(sys.exc_info(), "utf-8") 
    return

This is all working as expected when I run it on my Windows development machine and the djange testserver. The exception is caught when the command execution fails, the error handling works as expected.

When I move the code to my production server (ubuntu, apache), I get an "Internal Server Error 500" when the command execution fails which is not the desired behaviour. The apache error.log is not very helpful since it does not show any error.

My configuration is: Apache/2.2.22 (Ubuntu) PHP/5.4.9-4ubuntu2.3 mod_wsgi/3.4 Python/2.7.4

(Yes, I restarted apache and I'm sure I run on the same code).

Any ideas on this one?

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1  
If catch-all exception handling is not catching this, then either you are not running this code, or the exception in production happens outside of the try block. The 500 could even be due to an error completely outside python. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 17 '13 at 7:02
2  
Introduce a deliberate error in this section of code and see if you see a change in behaviour in production. That at least lets you rule out the possibility of running stale code. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 17 '13 at 7:02
    
thanks @MartijnPieters! I introduced a ZeroDevisionError and - tadaa - same behavior. This inspired me to inspect my exception handling from a different perspective - to make a long story short, another encoding problem was found. I'll explain in more detail in an answer to the question. –  OBu Oct 17 '13 at 11:16
    
BTW: Is it possible to end the bounty now and donate the 50 points to @MartijnPieters? –  OBu Oct 17 '13 at 13:43
    
I'd have to post an answer and you can then award the bounty to that. Reposted my comments as an answer, in case you want to do that. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Oct 17 '13 at 13:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

If catch-all exception handling is not catching this, then either you are not running this code, or the exception in production happens outside of the try block. The 500 could even be due to an error completely outside python.

Introduce a deliberate error in this section of code and see if you see a change in behaviour in production. That at least lets you rule out the possibility of running stale code.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for re-posting as an answer! Even though the complete solution is found in my answer below (so if anyone runs into a similar problem - scroll down a bit), I take this one as "accepted" since it helped my in finding the solution. –  OBu Oct 17 '13 at 13:48
    
In the generic case, my answer is still correct; your problem lay in a new exception outside of the try block. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 17 '13 at 13:51
    
This is why I upvoted and marked it as accepted ;-). Thanks again! –  OBu Oct 17 '13 at 13:53

Thanks to Martijn Pieters's comments and questions, I found some errors which resutled in the strange behaviour:

  • The except subprocess.CalledProcessError as e: part contained some unicode-conversions which run fine on system a and caused problems on system b. Therefore, a UnicodeConversionError was raised in my exception handling and this caused the 500 error since it was not caught.

  • An other problem in the posted code is, that unicode(sys.exc_info(), "utf-8")is raising an exception as well, because sys.exc_info() returns a tuple which is correctly converted to a string when using the str()-method, but unicode() can only deal with strings and not with tuples. One work around which did the job for me is unicode(str(...)).

Thanks to everyone who spent time in solving this question!

share|improve this answer
    
Right, which means the exception was indeed outside of the try block. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 17 '13 at 13:46

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