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when i am using if statements with multiple conditions, how are they managed in the compiler?

A) Will it ignore the second Statement, if the first statement is not fulfilled or vice versa?

If(time > 3.0 && hitEnabled)

B) Late Defintions are often recommended, so should i prefere to use one condition in if statements?

if(time > 3.0)
    if(hitEnabled)

Thanks!

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2  
google short circuiting –  doctorlove Oct 14 '13 at 9:26
    
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2a723cdk.aspx Read the remarks area at the very top. The same goes for ||. Personally with conditional statements I focus on making them readable to express intent as opposed to "optimised". –  Adam Houldsworth Oct 14 '13 at 9:27
1  
or mpore accurately google "short-circuit evaluation" (-: –  Rob Wells Oct 14 '13 at 9:33

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted
if(time > 3.0 && hitEnabled)

In above statement hitEnabled will not be evaluated when time > 3.0 is false.

This is called short-circuit.

Following statement will evaluate hitEnabled even when time > 3.0 is false but returns true when both operands are true.

if(time > 3.0 & hitEnabled)//note bitwise &

if(time > 3.0)
    if(hitEnabled)

Nested if statements are helpful when you need first condition to be checked many times etc.

if(time > 3.0 && hitEnabled)
{
//DoSomething1
}
if(time > 3.0 && flag)
{
//DoSomething2
}

This can be re written with nested if statements as follows

if(time > 3.0)
{
    if(hitEnabled)
    {
    //DoSomething1
    }
    if(flag)
    {
    //DoSomething2
    }
}

In this case I prefer nested if statement to avoid unnecessary checks

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The fact that the second operand is always evaluated isn't the only difference between && and &. Implicit conversions work differently as well, and if implicit conversions are involved, you may end up with a & b false even when both a and b are true. –  James Kanze Oct 14 '13 at 9:47
    
@JamesKanze I can't follow you. Are you talking about EvilBool thing? –  Sriram Sakthivel Oct 14 '13 at 9:49
    
No. I'm just pointing out that & and | are not boolean operators, and don't operate on bool. Any bool in the expression will be implicitly converted to int. If both operators are actually bool (and correctly initialized), there should be no problem, but otherwise... if somebool & isalpha( ch ) is likely to evaluate to false, even if both conditions are true. –  James Kanze Oct 14 '13 at 13:24
    
@JamesKanze bool cant be implicitly converted to int. I just tested –  Sriram Sakthivel Oct 14 '13 at 13:27
    
§4.6/6: "A prvalue of type bool can be converted to a prvalue of type int, with false becoming zero and true becoming one." –  James Kanze Oct 14 '13 at 13:50

In case of an && if the first condition is false, the second condition will never be evaluated and the overall result is false. In case of an ||, if the first condition is true the second condition is not evaluated and the overall result is true. As Rob pointed out, it is known as short circuit evaluation.

This is useful in cases when we want to evaluate the second operand of the if statement only if the first operand returns true. For example, we may want to check for the validity of a variable before using it.

if(ptr != NULL && *ptr > x)

In this case the value of ptr will be checked against x only if it is not NULL.

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1  
It's called short-circuit evaluation to give it its proper name @Kunal. (-: –  Rob Wells Oct 14 '13 at 9:32
    
@RobWells I will add that in the answer. Thanks. –  Kunal Oct 14 '13 at 9:35

A) It won't check hitEnabled if first condition will be false, if you want to do it you must use short-circuit AND (&) like below. Even if first condition will be False, it will check second one.

If(time > 3.0 & hitEnabled)

B) It strongly depends on what you want from you application and less on performance of your hardware. If you want to check both conditions in any case, B option is perfectly fine, but if you certain if you time > 3.0 is false and you don't want check second one, A option is preferable in my opinion. As I said before it is strongly depends on the logic of your program, so you can't get the right answer based on one line of code.

If you ask just about what better manner of writing without logic background, it's up to you. Both variants easy to read, if you follow code conventions.

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When short-circuit AND is used, both statements are checked, but if one of them is false, the whole statement is false, so what is the sense using short-circuit AND? –  user1767754 Oct 14 '13 at 9:49
    
@user1767754 It depends on logic of your conditions. There are occasions when you want check using AND operator if all conditions true or false, and then you use short-circuit AND, but if first condition is false and you don't care about the other conditions(whether they true or false), so there is no any sense to use & you can use ordinary &&. –  user2771704 Oct 14 '13 at 9:59

The evaluation of the expression stops as soon as it is conclusively true or false.

This allows expressions like if (x != null && x.property ... as x.property will not be evaluated if x is null etc.

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        String someString = null;

        if (someString != null && someString[4].Equals('a'))
        {
            //// not called
        }

        if (someString != null || someString[4].Equals('a'))
        {
            //// exception
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
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In the first case:

If(time > 3.0 && hitEnabled)

If time > 3.0 is false then hitEnabled will never be checked. And it always starts checking conditions from left to right.

If you want to make sure that all conditions will be checked you should use || (logical OR) instead of && (logical AND) for example:

If(time > 3.0 || hitEnabled)

This:

if(time > 3.0 && hitEnabled)

equals

if(time > 3.0)
if(hitEnabled)
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I know, that the OR Operator is an option, my question was not about operators, but how the compiler handles the && operator within an If Condition –  user1767754 Oct 14 '13 at 9:42
    
Maybe I didn't make it clear enough but it is also included in my answer here: 'If time > 3.0 is false then hitEnabled will never be checked. And it always starts checking conditions from left to right.' –  Tafari Oct 14 '13 at 9:49

If the first condition is violated it wont check for the second one and it simply ignores. If you want to put any code it is always better to make it nested.

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