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We are in a big problem with receiving UDP broadcast packets. I'm going crazy...

The problem is:

1-All works well.

2-We can receive packets.

3-If i don't close the android ( home button or key off not pressed), I let android go to sleep (screen off--> OnPause and OnStop)

4-I turn off my Access Point (no wifi, to simulate go out of home).

5-I wait 2 minutes

6-I turn on Access point

7-When Android wakes up, I receive timeouts all the time, in this scenario:

If I launch another time the app with eclipse-> Timeout

If I destroy the app (back button) and restart (onCreate) the app --> timeout

If I press home button to wake up --> timeout

If I disable and enable wifi --> OK, I receive the packets

If I press key off to wake up --> OK, I receive the packets

                Asycntask do in background{
                .....
                byte[] message = new byte[1500];
                s = new DatagramSocket(null);
                s.setReuseAddress(true);
                s.bind(new InetSocketAddress(dataclass.getDataclass().GGGPort));
                p = new DatagramPacket(message, message.length);
                s.setSoTimeout(500);
                s.setBroadcast(true);
                dataclass.getDataclass().setGoOut(true);
                s.receive(p);
                }

The Questions:

1-What is the difference between home button and key off button to wake up android? They do the same -> OnPause, OnStop--> (unlock) OnRestart. What happens with wifi?

2-Why when the program is running but not receiving,it works ok if I disable/enable wifi? It means that the code is OK... It's a android issue?

P.D: I kill Asynctask OnStop and I execute on Restart

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2 Answers 2

I think that the matter can be that WiFi is turned off on Android to save battery. I do not know exactly conditions to resume WIFi back, probably if you send packets, it will be enabled.

To keep on WiFi and receive packets you may need to use WifiManager.WifiLock. There's also MulticastLock, but seems you do not need it.

From docs:

Allows an application to keep the Wi-Fi radio awake. Normally the Wi-Fi radio may turn off when the user has not used the device in a while. Acquiring a WifiLock will keep the radio on until the lock is released.

Before using a WifiLock, consider carefully if your application requires Wi-Fi access, or could function over a mobile network, if available. A program that needs to download large files should hold a WifiLock to ensure that the download will complete, but a program whose network usage is occasional or low-bandwidth should not hold a WifiLock to avoid adversely affecting battery life.

Any application using a WifiLock must request the android.permission.WAKE_LOCK permission in an element of the application's manifest.

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Also you may want to look at this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/9363389/… –  Mixaz Mar 3 at 16:56

This thread deals with the problem: https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/android-platform/OpbSdp9FTmA

Bascially, the solution is

Acquire a PARTIAL_WAKE_LOCK, and trap when the screen goes off. Then disable and reenable the wifi. This works because the filter only turns on when the screen goes off, so starting wifi with the screen off will keep it working until the screen goes off again.

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