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I have a project where I would like to store a large structure (nested objects) in a relational db (Postgres). It's part of a larger structure and I don't really care about the serialization format - I'm happy for it to be a blob in a column - I'd just like to be able to persist and restore it fairly quickly.

For my purposes the SQLAlchemy PickleType mostly does the job. The issue I have is that I'd like the dirty checks to work (something that the Mutable Types are used for). I'd like them to work not only if I change info in the paths but also in the bounds (which sit another level down).

class Group(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'group'

    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String, nullable=False)
    paths = Column(types.PickleType)

class Path(object):
    def __init__(self, style, bounds):
        self.style = style
        self.bounds = bounds

class Bound(object):
    def __init__(self, l, t, r, b):
        self.l = l
        self.t = t
        self.r = r
        self.b = b

# this is all fine
g = Group(name='g1', paths=[Path('blah', Bound(1,1,2,3)),
                            Path('other_style', Bound(1,1,2,3)),])
session.add(g)
session.commit()

# so is this
g.name = 'g2'
assert g in session.dirty
session.commit()

# but this won't work without some sort of tracking on the deeper objects
g.paths[0].style = 'something else'
assert g in session.dirty # nope

I've played around with the Mutable types trying to get it working but haven't had any luck. Elsewhere I do use the mutable types for a json column which is fine - in a way that seems simpler though because with these classes you need to track changes to objects within the objects too.

Any thoughts appreciated.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First of all, as you realized, you have to track changes to objects within the objects, since there's no way for SQLAlchemy to know an inner object changed. So, we'll get that out of the way with a base mutable object we can use for both:

class MutableObject(Mutable, object):
    @classmethod
    def coerce(cls, key, value):
        return value

    def __getstate__(self): 
        d = self.__dict__.copy()
        d.pop('_parents', None)
        return d

    def __setstate__(self, state):
        self.__dict__ = state

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        object.__setattr__(self, name, value)
        self.changed()


class Path(MutableObject):
    def __init__(self, style, bounds):
        super(MutableObject, self).__init__()
        self.style = style
        self.bounds = bounds


class Bound(MutableObject):
    def __init__(self, l, t, r, b):
        super(MutableObject, self).__init__()
        self.l = l
        self.t = t
        self.r = r
        self.b = b

And we also need to track the changes on the paths list, so, we have to make that a mutable object too. However, the Mutable tracks changes in children by propagating them to the parents when the changed() method is called, and the current implementation in SQLAlchemy seems to only assign a parent to someone assigned as an attribute, not as an item of a sequence, like a dictionary or a list. This is where things get complicated.

I think the list items should have the list itself as a parent, but that doesn't work for two reasons: first, the _parents weakdict can't take a list for a key, and second, the changed() signal doesn't propagate all the way to the top, so, we will just be marking the list itself as changed. I'm not 100% sure how correct this is, but the way to go seems to be assigning the list's parent to every item, so the group object gets the flag_modified call when an item is changed. This should do it.

class MutableList(Mutable, list):
    @classmethod
    def coerce(cls, key, value):
        if not isinstance(value, MutableList):
            if isinstance(value, list):
                return MutableList(value)
            value = Mutable.coerce(key, value)

        return value        

    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
        old_value = list.__getitem__(self, key)
        for obj, key in self._parents.items():
            old_value._parents.pop(obj, None)

        list.__setitem__(self, key, value)
        for obj, key in self._parents.items():
            value._parents[obj] = key

        self.changed()

    def __getstate__(self):
        return list(self)

    def __setstate__(self, state):
        self[:] = state

However, there's one last issue here. The parents get assigned by a call listening on the 'load' event, so at the time of initialization, the _parents dict is empty, and the children get nothing assigned. I think maybe there's some cleaner way you can do that by listening on the load event too, but I figured the dirty way to do it would be to reassign the parents when the items are retrieve, so, add this:

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        value = list.__getitem__(self, key)

        for obj, key in self._parents.items():
            value._parents[obj] = key

        return value

Finally, we have to use that MutableList on Group.paths:

class Group(BaseModel):
    __tablename__ = 'group'

    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = db.Column(db.String, nullable=False)
    paths = db.Column(MutableList.as_mutable(types.PickleType))

And with all this your test code should work:

g = Group(name='g1', paths=[Path('blah', Bound(1,1,2,3)),
                            Path('other_style', Bound(1,1,2,3)),])

session.add(g)
db.session.commit()

g.name = 'g2'
assert g in db.session.dirty
db.session.commit()

g.paths[0].style = 'something else'
assert g in db.session.dirty

Frankly, I'm not sure how safe it is to get this on production, and if you don't need a flexible schema, you'd be probably better using a table and relationships for Path and Bound.

share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant answer, thanks for taking the time to work all that out - I appreciate that it's a very nonstandard case. That's the general idea of how I figured it would work but couldn't quite grasp the details. I need to study this a bit closer to really understand it - as you say, maybe not a good idea to even go this route. Your idea of how to work around the list issue is very clever, and one I'm not sure I would have hit upon. Thanks again. Will give you a bounty on this when I'm not on a mobile :) –  Aidan Kane Nov 2 '13 at 23:11
    
Thanks. I'm glad to help. –  Pedro Werneck Nov 3 '13 at 0:13
    
Annoyingly the minimum bounty I can give on this question is now 200 because I previously had a bounty on here. I've started a bounty on a totally unrelated question that I'll be able to reward you in 24 hours time. –  Aidan Kane Nov 4 '13 at 9:21
    
Don't worry. As I said, I'm glad to help. –  Pedro Werneck Nov 4 '13 at 9:33
    
I keep my word. Also, I started the bounty already, so it would be silly to give it to anyone else :) –  Aidan Kane Nov 4 '13 at 10:01

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