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I have the following dataframe:

 df = data.frame(A_1 = c(1,2,3), A_2 = c(4,5,6), A_3 = c(7,8,9), B_1 = c(10, 11, 12), B_2 = c(13, 14, 15), B_3 = c(16, 17, 18))

 #> df
 #  A_1 A_2 A_3 B_1 B_2 B_3
 #1   1   4   7  10  13  16
 #2   2   5   8  11  14  17
 #3   3   6   9  12  15  18

The column names contain both a letter and a number. The letter refers to a specific variable (e.g A is a factor, B is a factor), while the numbers in the column names, refer to individuals. In other words, each individual has values for A and B: A_1 and B_1 are columns for Individual 1, and A_2, B_2 are columns for Individual 2, etc.

I would like to achieve the following result: note that all the "A" columns are merge into one "A" column, and the same goes for the "B" columns, etc. :

   A  B
 # 1 10
 # 2 11
 # 3 12
 # 4 13
 # 5 14
 # 6 15
 # 7 16
 # 8 17
 # 9 18

Is there any easy way to achieve that? Please note that my real dataframe contains more than 20 distinct letter columns (A, B, C, ...), each letter having three subcolumns (e.g: A_1, A_2, A_3).

Thanks!!

share|improve this question
    
You have tagged this data.table. Are you using the "data.table" package? Or did you mean "data.frame"? Also, note that the dataframes tag is not related to the data structure in R, so I've edited that tag and replaced it with "data.frame". –  Ananda Mahto Oct 14 '13 at 13:50
    
I added the data.table tag in case the solution was easier to achieve with datatables. But thanks for the edit! –  Mayou Oct 14 '13 at 13:51
2  
In that case, I've added a data.table option for you too :) –  Ananda Mahto Oct 14 '13 at 14:11
    
Thanks! I have also modified the title according to your suggestion! –  Mayou Oct 14 '13 at 14:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is known as "reshaping" your data from a "wide" format to a "long" format. In base R, one tool is reshape, but you'll need an "id" variable first:

reshape(df, direction = "long", varying = names(df), sep = "_")
#     time A  B id
# 1.1    1 1 10  1
# 2.1    1 2 11  2
# 3.1    1 3 12  3
# 1.2    2 4 13  1
# 2.2    2 5 14  2
# 3.2    2 6 15  3
# 1.3    3 7 16  1
# 2.3    3 8 17  2
# 3.3    3 9 18  3

You can drop the other columns if required.


For fun, here's another approach, using the "reshape2" package (start with your original sample data):

library(reshape2)
dfL <- melt(as.matrix(df))
dfL <- cbind(dfL, colsplit(dfL$Var2, "_", c("Factor", "Individual")))
dcast(dfL, Individual + Var1 ~ Factor, value.var="value")
#   Individual Var1 A  B
# 1          1    1 1 10
# 2          1    2 2 11
# 3          1    3 3 12
# 4          2    1 4 13
# 5          2    2 5 14
# 6          2    3 6 15
# 7          3    1 7 16
# 8          3    2 8 17
# 9          3    3 9 18

If you live on the bleeding edge, "data.table" version 1.8.11 has now implemented "melt" and "dcast". I haven't played much with it yet, but it is pretty straightforward too. Again, as with all the solutions I've provided so far, an "id" is needed.

library(reshape2)
library(data.table)
packageVersion("data.table") ## Must be at least 1.8.11 to work
# [1] ‘1.8.11’

DT <- data.table(cbind(id = sequence(nrow(df)), df))
DTL <- melt(DT, id.vars="id")
DTL[, c("Fac", "Ind") := colsplit(variable, "_", c("Fac", "Ind"))]
dcast.data.table(DTL, Ind + id ~ Fac)
#    Ind id A  B
# 1:   1  1 1 10
# 2:   1  2 2 11
# 3:   1  3 3 12
# 4:   2  1 4 13
# 5:   2  2 5 14
# 6:   2  3 6 15
# 7:   3  1 7 16
# 8:   3  2 8 17
# 9:   3  3 9 18

Update

Another option is to use merged.stack from my "splitstackshape" package. It works nicely if you also use as.data.table(df, keep.rownames = TRUE), which would create the equivalent of the data.table(cbind(id = sequence(nrow(df)), df)) step in the "data.table" approach.

library(splitstackshape)
merged.stack(as.data.table(df, keep.rownames = TRUE), 
             var.stubs = c("A", "B"), sep = "_")
#    rn .time_1 A  B
# 1:  1       1 1 10
# 2:  1       2 4 13
# 3:  1       3 7 16
# 4:  2       1 2 11
# 5:  2       2 5 14
# 6:  2       3 8 17
# 7:  3       1 3 12
# 8:  3       2 6 15
# 9:  3       3 9 18

And for fairness/completeness, here's an approach with "tidyr" + "dplyr".

library(tidyr)
library(dplyr)
df %>%
  gather(var, value, A_1:B_3) %>%
  separate(var, c("var", "time")) %>%
  group_by(var, time) %>%
  mutate(grp = sequence(n())) %>%
  ungroup() %>%
  spread(var, value)
# Source: local data frame [9 x 4]
# 
#   time grp A  B
# 1    1   1 1 10
# 2    1   2 2 11
# 3    1   3 3 12
# 4    2   1 4 13
# 5    2   2 5 14
# 6    2   3 6 15
# 7    3   1 7 16
# 8    3   2 8 17
# 9    3   3 9 18
share|improve this answer
    
Great. Thank you. Could you please explain what the role of "id" is? Thanks –  Mayou Oct 14 '13 at 13:39
    
@Mariam, you can just think of that of a way to identify each unique record (in this case, a row). –  Ananda Mahto Oct 14 '13 at 13:40
    
Perfect. Thank you! –  Mayou Oct 14 '13 at 13:41
    
+1 nice way to group the columns. I must try and remember that. –  Simon O'Hanlon Oct 14 '13 at 13:46

I'd unlist the relevant columns of a data.frame. There are many ways to group the columns into unqiue persons (I really like Ananda's for instance), but using regular expressions is another way...

#  Find unique persons
IDs <- unique( gsub( "([A-Z]).*" , "\\1" , names( df ) ) )
[1] "A" "B"

# Unlist columns relevant to that person
out <- sapply( IDs , function(x) unlist( df[ , grepl( x , names( df ) ) ] , use.names = FALSE ) )

#  Change from matrix to data.frame
data.frame( out )
#  A  B
#1 1 10
#2 2 11
#3 3 12
#4 4 13
#5 5 14
#6 6 15
#7 7 16
#8 8 17
#9 9 18
share|improve this answer
1  
I like this approach as well! Thanks! –  Mayou Oct 14 '13 at 13:45
    
+1 for unlist. There's also stack and melt, of course. I added the melt + dcast version to my answer. –  Ananda Mahto Oct 14 '13 at 13:49

You can get the data in the shape you want like this:

> m<-as.matrix(df)
> dim(m)<-c(nrow(m)*3,ncol(m)/3)
> m
      [,1] [,2]
 [1,]    1   10
 [2,]    2   11
 [3,]    3   12
 [4,]    4   13
 [5,]    5   14
 [6,]    6   15
 [7,]    7   16
 [8,]    8   17
 [9,]    9   18

That same code should work for a large data frame, as long as there are three columns per individual. Then you just need to assign column names.

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