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How many maximum words can i store in String array in java? I am working on machine learning algorithms and my requirement is huge approximately 3000 words. Suggest me any alternative to process that data because i have tried with array and it is not working.

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5  
You can't hold 3000 references in a String[]?! Could we see the code you tried –  Richard Tingle Oct 14 '13 at 14:00
1  
3000 is not a huge number. You should show some code to determine what the real issue is. –  lurker Oct 14 '13 at 14:02
    
    
3000 words should work just fine. 9000 000 pairs or words could be worse. –  Jan Dvorak Oct 14 '13 at 14:02
1  
3 billion is huge. 3 thousand isn't. –  Boann Oct 14 '13 at 14:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have stated you are recieving an ArrayIndexOutOfBounds exception, this is because you are using more than the stated size of the array

String[] strings=new String[3000];
strings[3000]="something";//causes exception because strings[2999] is the last entry.

If you know how many entries you require then declare an array of that size, or if you need an array style container that can be extended use an arraylist.

ArrayList<String> strings=new ArrayList<String>();
strings.add("Something"); //can be added as many times as you want (or that available memory will allow)

ArrayLists automatically resize as you add items to them, they are ideal when you want list behaviour (i.e. things are in an order) but don't know in advance how many items you will have.

You can then retrieve items from the list as you see fit, most common methods are;

String string=strings.get(0); //returns the first entry
int size=strings.size(); //tells you how many items are currently in the array list

Notes

You can improve ArrayList performance by telling it how big you expect it to be, so ArrayList<String> strings=new ArrayList<String>(3000); but this is entirely optional

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Thanks mate it is working –  Subodh Mankar Oct 14 '13 at 14:20
    
Yeah sure new to stackoverflow dint know about it –  Subodh Mankar Oct 14 '13 at 14:23
    
@user2773586 Mainly it just marks that your problem is solved (although people can still add new answers). Don't let anyone (myself included) bully you into accepting however, and you can always change your accepted answer –  Richard Tingle Oct 14 '13 at 14:24
    
Yes thanks for great suggestions –  Subodh Mankar Oct 14 '13 at 14:26

You can find how much memory you have for your disposal at JVM by using this code :

long maxBytes = Runtime.getRuntime().maxMemory();
System.out.println("Max memory: " + maxBytes / 1024 / 1024 + "M");

Note that if you want to know how much strings in array you can have, devide the whole number by ~64, which is average length of String. (counting all the references etc.)

System.out.println("Max words: " + maxBytes / 64 + " words");

If you have average machine, you should have at least 2GB RAM at your disposal just for allocating variables, which is ~30 milions average words.

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2  
While this is useful information it doesn't strictly speaking answer this question –  Richard Tingle Oct 14 '13 at 14:05
    
450 million words in 2 gigabytes would imply 4.7 bytes per word. But given that a char is 2 bytes, and the char array has an 8-byte object header and a 4-byte length, and the object size is probably rounded to a multiple of 8 or 16 bytes for organization on the heap, plus the String object's char[] pointer and two different cached hashCodes at 4 bytes apiece, and the String object header and the reference needed to point to the String object, a typical String word is probably closer to 64 bytes, or ~33.5 million in 2 GB. –  Boann Oct 14 '13 at 14:24
    
Boann - good point, post updated. –  libik Oct 14 '13 at 14:30

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