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Ok, my linq skills aren't great so im trying to do the following.

Say I have 6000 records (email address) I want to add the first 1000 add to bcc, send, take the next 1000 add to bcc, send, take the 1000 add to bcc, send, etc....

Ive started wrinting,

string[] files = System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(@"C:\Mail\ ", "*.csv");

Parallel.ForEach(files, currentFile =>
{
    string filename = currentFile;
    StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(filename);
    var emailList = new List<String>();
    while (reader.Peek() >= 0)
    {
        emailList.Add(reader.ReadLine());
    }
    \\Here is where I need to do the linq?
    IEnumerable<string> list = emailList

    var message = new System.Net.Mail.MailMessage();
    foreach (var s in list)
    {
        MailAddress mailAddress = new MailAddress(s);
        message.Bcc.Add(mailAddress);
    }

    message.Subject = txtSubject.Text;
    message.From = new System.Net.Mail.MailAddress(txtFrom.Text);
    message.Body = txtMessage.Text;
    message.IsBodyHtml = true;
    var smtp = new System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient();

    smtp.Send(message);
share|improve this question
    
so what is the problem ?? – Dhaval Oct 14 '13 at 14:28
1  
you don't need Linq for this at all - move your email sending code into a separate method and call that after you have enough addresses in your initial while loop – BrokenGlass Oct 14 '13 at 14:30
2  
@BrokenGlass You never need LINQ. It may or may not be an acceptable tool to use to solve the problem. – Servy Oct 14 '13 at 14:31

You seem to be looking for a Batch method. Here is one implementation:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int batchSize)
{
    List<T> buffer = new List<T>(batchSize);

    foreach (T item in source)
    {
        buffer.Add(item);

        if (buffer.Count >= batchSize)
        {
            yield return buffer;
            buffer = new List<T>(batchSize);
        }
    }
    if (buffer.Count > 0)
    {
        yield return buffer;
    }
}

You can now write:

foreach(var batch in emailList.Batch(1000))
{
    var message = CreateMessage();
    foreach(var email in batch)
    {
        message.Bcc.Add(email);
    }
    message.Send();
}

On a side note, rather than using a StreamReader to read the file's lines, you can use File.ReadLines to get an IEnumerable<string> representing the lines in the file. It even has the side benefit of streaming the data rather than pulling all of the lines into memory first.

share|improve this answer
    
This way, you would be iterating over all e-mail addresses twice. BrokenGlass' implementation only iterates once. Although technically this answers how to achieve this in Linq. – RGraham Oct 14 '13 at 14:35
    
@RGraham See the edit at the end; that's a result of the OP using an undesirable mechanism to read the file into memory, which is easily resolved. – Servy Oct 14 '13 at 14:36
    
Doesn't ReadLines use StreamReader internally? I don't think StreamReader puts everything into memory, does it? And can you provide a source because I've been using it in a lot of cases I really shouldn't have!! – RGraham Oct 14 '13 at 14:42
2  
@RGraham ReadLines streams the data yes; it fetches the next line when the enumerator asks for it, rather than all up front. The OP's code, despite using a StreamReader, doesn't stream the data; instead it uses the stream reader to just pull all of it into a list, thus preventing streaming the data. – Servy Oct 14 '13 at 14:44
    
Ahhh, I see what you mean now - thanks for clarifying :) – RGraham Oct 14 '13 at 14:45

If you want to do it with linq I believe this answer will do exactly what you are looking for, modified below where you send in group = 1000

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Split<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int group)
{
    return  source
        .Select((x, i) => new { Index = i, Value = x })
        .GroupBy(x => x.Index / group)
        .Select(x => x.Select(v => v.Value).ToList())
        .ToList();
}

Should This be a comment and not an answer. Please let me know and I will delete and change if that is the case

share|improve this answer
    
Please explain the -1, thank you. I can update my answer based on comments not on -1. – Harrison Oct 14 '13 at 17:17

Move your email sending code into a separate method and call that after you have enough addresses in your initial while loop:

var emailList = new List<String>();
while (reader.Peek() >= 0)
{
    emailList.Add(reader.ReadLine());
    if(emailList.Count == 1000)
    {
        SendEmails(emailList);
        emailList = new List<String>();
    }
}
//send the rest, if any
if(emailList.Any()) SendEmails(emailList);

This is much cleaner imo anyway since your email sending method is logically separated from the way you acquire the email addresses.

share|improve this answer
    
reader.Peek() is a real performance killer, string line; while((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null) { emailList.Add(line); is a much better way of doing it. – Scott Chamberlain Oct 14 '13 at 14:44
1  
@ScottChamberlain Better still is to just foreach(var line in File.ReadLines(filename)) – Servy Oct 14 '13 at 14:45

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