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class Person {
.....
}    
class Book {
    string title;
    Person person;
    ....
    Person getPerson() {
        return person;
    }
    ....
}

int main() {
Person p1;
Book b1;

b1.setPerson(p1);

b1.getPerson();


}

My question is what is the value of person in b1, what does b1.getPerson() return? How can I check whether that field has a value or not? I want to check whether the book has an assigned person to it, if not, then assign a person.

  bool isPerson(Person _person, Book _book) {
        if (_book.getPerson() == NULL) {
            _book.setPerson(_person);
            return true;
        }
        else {
            return false;
        }

This is what I wanted to do, but ==NULL is not correct.

Thank you!

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8  
Book has a Person that gets default constructed. It is an object, and it is unlikely to be comparable to NULL, which is used to express a null pointer. –  juanchopanza Oct 14 '13 at 14:30
    
To add to @juanchopanza your Book constructors should include logic to call and initialize your Person constructors in one way or another. –  nhgrif Oct 14 '13 at 14:33
    
That's what you would do in JAVA. In C++, if you don't declare something as a pointer, you also can't assign NULL to it. person is not a pointer in your class, instead your book class directly contains the person object, and it therefore also cannot ben ull –  codeling Oct 14 '13 at 14:42
    
Thank you so much everyone! –  user2879175 Oct 14 '13 at 14:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have at least two options:

1 Use pointers

That's the option you seem to want to go for with using NULL and stuff... if the person for the book is really optional, you can make a pointer (or even better, a shared_ptr or some other smart pointer) out of the person member to make it possible to have the state "person not set", e.g.

class Book {
    string title;
    std::shared_ptr<Person> person;
    void getPerson(std::shared_ptr<Person> p) {
         return person = p;
    }

    std::shared_ptr<Person> getPerson() {
         return person;
    }
};

You'll have to access members of that person with -> then though (e.g., let's assume person has a constructor taking the name, and a getName function:) - of course you'll have to be careful to not dereference an unset pointer, just as well as with raw pointers (or with the references in Java, where to me it seems you might come from?).

Book b1;
// ... set Person ...
b1.setPerson(std::make_shared<Person>("John"));

Then you can check if person is set simply by checking the default bool operator of the std::shared_ptr, like this:

// somewhere in Book class:
if (person) ...

2 "Empty" convention

Make a convention for what it means for a person to be unset (e.g. that when the name is empty, it is the "default", i.e. unset person). Then you can simply check in Book class:

if (person.getName().empty()) ...

Notice however that with this option you're more likely to run into problems when your Person class changes, as it is now tightly coupled into the Book class. E.g. at some point you might require for the Person's name to actually be set on construction, you'd have to change your logic in Book as well.

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As mentioned before, the default constructor of the Person class will be called. in case you did not write your own constructor (the default constructor will be called) and did not initialize any members of the instance in the constructor the members will contain the values that were in the memory when the memory allocation occurred.

In this case it will just contain the garbage on the stack (since it is allocated on the stack.)

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It will return whatever your default constructor of Person creates.

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class Book
{
private:
    Person p1;
public:
    Book()
    { }

    friend bool operator== (const Book& b, const Person& p)
    {
        return &b.p1 == &p;
    }
};
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