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We've got thousands of files saved in one directory. The common pattern there is date. For example:

foo-2013-09-01.gz
bar-2013-09-01.gz
fu-2013-09-02.gz
ba-2013-09-02.gz
cat-2013-09-01.gz
dog-2013-09-02.gz
dog-2013-09-03.gz

How could we then get the list of unique file names just before the first dash? E.g.

foo
bar
fu
ba
cat
dog

We're not bothered with path names, but just the first part (if you can see this in type-date.filext format). We intend to use the final result in a for-loop, which will create a subdirectory for each type that has all its other files by date.

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How does it relate to Hadoop? –  Tariq Oct 14 '13 at 19:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way would be to say:

ls -1 | sed 's/-.*//g' | sort -u

To avoid parsing ls output, you could say:

find . -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -type f -printf "%P\n" | sed 's/-.*//g' | sort -u
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Pure BASH way:

s='foo-2013-09-01.gz'
echo "${s%%-*}"
foo
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Assuming you have the list of files:

... | awk -F'-' '!x[$0=$1]++' | xargs mkdir
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Use sed 's/-.*//':

falsetru@ubuntu:/tmp/t$ ls
ba-2013-09-02.gz   cat-2013-09-01.gz  dog-2013-09-03.gz  fu-2013-09-02.gz
bar-2013-09-01.gz  dog-2013-09-02.gz  foo-2013-09-01.gz
falsetru@ubuntu:/tmp/t$ ls | sed 's/-.*//'
ba
bar
cat
dog
dog
foo
fu
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's/-.*//;G;/^([^\n]+)\n.*\<\1\>/d;h;P;d' file

Truncate the file name, then use the hold space to check for unique keys. If the key already exists delete that line otherwise add it to the hold space and then print the unique key.

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