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I'm about to download a page encoded in UTF-8. So this is my code:

using (WebClient client = new WebClient())
{
    client.Headers.Add("user-agent", Request.UserAgent);

    htmlPage = client.DownloadString(HttpUtility.UrlDecode(resoruce_url));

    var KeysParsed = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(client.ResponseHeaders["Content-Type"].Replace(" ", "").Replace(";", "&"));
    var charset = ((KeysParsed["charset"] != null) ? KeysParsed["charset"] : "UTF-8");
    Response.Write(client.ResponseHeaders);

    byte[] bytePage = Encoding.GetEncoding(charset).GetBytes(htmlPage);
    using (var reader = new StreamReader(new MemoryStream(bytePage), Encoding.GetEncoding(charset)))
    {
        htmlPage = reader.ReadToEnd();
        Response.Write(htmlPage);
    }
}

so, it set UTF-8 for the encoding. But the downloaded title, for example, show in my screen as:

Sexy cover: 60 e più di “quei dischi” vietati ai minori

and not as:

Sexy cover: 60 e più di “quei dischi” vietati ai minori

somethings is wrong, but I don't find where. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
What does it say if you use a web browser? –  Gusdor Oct 14 '13 at 15:06
    
Using a web browser the correct text on the title is Sexy cover: 60 e più di “quei dischi” vietati ai minori. Try yourself, open it with Firefox :) –  markzzz Oct 14 '13 at 15:08
1  
"Sexy covers". I'm at work sir. Try UTF-16 and ASCII Western European and see what it says. Are you sure you should be defaulting to UTF-8? –  Gusdor Oct 14 '13 at 15:10
    
Also, are there any headers that may tell you what the encoding is? –  Gusdor Oct 14 '13 at 15:15
    
var KeysParsed = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(client.ResponseHeaders["Content-Type"].Replace(" ", "").Replace(";", "&")); What is this code supposed to be doing? –  Matthew Oct 14 '13 at 15:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is that by the time you get the data it's already been converted.

When WebClient.DownloadString executes, it gets the raw bytes and converts them to a string using the default encoding. The damage is done. You can't take the resulting string, turn it back into bytes, and re-interpret it.

Put another way, this is what's happening:

// WebClient.DownloadString does, essentially, this.
byte[] rawBytes = DownloadData();
string htmlPage = Encoding.Default.GetString(rawBytes);

// Now you're doing this:
byte[] myBytes = Encoding.Utf8.GetBytes(htmlPage);

But myBytes will not necessarily be the same as rawBytes.

If you know what encoding to use beforehand, you can set the WebClient instance's Encoding property. If you want to interpret the string based on the encoding specified in the Content-Type header, then you have to download the raw bytes, determine the encoding, and use that to interpret the string. For example:

var rawBytes = client.DownloadData(HttpUtility.UrlDecode(resoruce_url));
var KeysParsed = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(client.ResponseHeaders["Content-Type"].Replace(" ", "").Replace(";", "&"));
var charset = ((KeysParsed["charset"] != null) ? KeysParsed["charset"] : "UTF-8");

var theEncoding = Encoding.GetEncoding(charset);
htmlPage = theEncoding.GetString(rawBytes);
share|improve this answer
    
Ah there is GetString(), so I don't need GetBytes at all! thank you man! –  markzzz Oct 15 '13 at 7:20

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