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I'm wondering if it's possible to archive the following effect with CSS

Tabs

I found these articles that kind of help but the problem is that in my case the tab sides are diagonal not straight vertical lines:

http://css-tricks.com/tabs-with-round-out-borders/
http://css-tricks.com/better-tabs-with-round-out-borders/

Is it possible to do?

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closed as off-topic by John Conde, thirtydot, toniedzwiedz, showdev, Antonio Carlos Ribeiro Oct 14 '13 at 23:29

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A CSS approach wouldn't be cross-browser compatible; besides you won't be able to achieve a better result than the links you've given. You're best to use images. –  Stefan Dunn Oct 14 '13 at 15:32
    
Possible? Yes. But you will need auxiliary graphics to include in the CSS. It's not only one pixel or two like in the examples you linked there. –  opalenzuela Oct 14 '13 at 15:33
    
This is do-able with CSS only, using pseudo-elements and CSS3 transform: rotate. It will work with IE9 and above, and all other reasonable browsers, of course. Don't despair. :) I'll see if I can whip up a demo. –  mwcz Oct 14 '13 at 15:53
1  
@mwcz a demo would be nice, I've been toying around with it but the rounded corners are making it hard to align the sides with –  javiervd Oct 14 '13 at 15:55
1  
@mwcz: Actually, if you must do it with transform functions, you're better off with two skewXed elements; one for the left side and one for the right. That way you can still use border-radius easily. –  user1618143 Oct 14 '13 at 16:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's a proof of concept example with pure CSS. It uses pseudo-elements and rotate. It's pretty close to your source image and could get closer with some work.

screenshot

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/csDP9/9/

HTML:

<ul>
    <li>Sample 1</li>
    <li class="active">Sample 2</li>
    <li>Sample 3</li>
    <li>Sample 4</li>
</ul>

CSS:

/* Reset ul styles */
body { font-family: sans-serif; }
ul {
    list-style: none;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

ul {
    padding-left: 20px;
    z-index: 5;
}
ul li {
    color: grey;
    background: #fefefe;
    padding: 14px 24px 10px;
    margin: 0px -6px 0 10px;
    position: relative;
    float: left;
    text-align: center;
    z-index: 1;
}
ul li::before {
    content: '';
    display: block;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; left: 0;
    width: 70%;
    height: 100%;
    border-style: solid;
    border-color: #eee;
    border-width: 2px 0 2px 2px;
    border-radius: 8px 0 0 0;
    -webkit-transform: skewX(-20deg);
       -moz-transform: skewX(-20deg);
         -o-transform: skewX(-20deg);
            transform: skewX(-20deg);
    background-color: inherit;
    z-index: -1;
}
ul li::after {
    content: '';
    display: block;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0; right: 0;
    width: 70%;
    height: 100%;
    border-style: solid;
    border-color: #eee;
    border-width: 2px 2px 2px 0;
    border-radius: 0 8px 0 0;
    -webkit-transform: skewX(20deg);
       -moz-transform: skewX(20deg);
         -o-transform: skewX(20deg);
            transform: skewX(20deg);
    background-color: inherit;
    z-index: -1;
}
ul li.active {
    color: orange;
    z-index: 10;
}
ul li.active::before,
ul li.active::after {
    background-color: #fff;
    border-bottom-color: #fff;
}
ul li:not([class='active']):hover::before,
ul li:not([class='active']):hover::after {
    background-color: #efefef; 
}
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1  
Actually, I was thinking you'd put border-left, border-top, and border-radius on the left pseudoelement, and no top border at all on the central element. Make the left and right pseudoelement wide enough to overlap in the middle, and you don't need to worry about shifting them down just the right amount. –  user1618143 Oct 14 '13 at 17:50
    
@user1618143 Ah, even better. That's great; removes the concern about alignment. I updated the jsfiddle in the post. –  mwcz Oct 14 '13 at 17:59
1  
You actually didn't make them quite wide enough; there's a white triangle in the bottom center. Might be simplest to just set the same background color on the center element. –  user1618143 Oct 14 '13 at 18:02
1  
This is great, not 100% accurate but I'll take it any day before using images, thanks a lot –  javiervd Oct 14 '13 at 18:10
    
Fixed the white triangle @user1618143 mentioned and updated the code and demo. –  mwcz Oct 14 '13 at 18:11

You could do this with CSS Matrix Transforms, but, frankly, I wouldn't bother. It's complicated and the cross-browser compatibility is spotty. Just use images.

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That's what I'm afraid of, I'll use images if I can't come up with a decent solution hopefully someone can help me out :) –  javiervd Oct 14 '13 at 15:57

I think with CSS, you could not get tabs like your exemple. Best solution is to use images or Matrix transform (as others have already answered).

Anyway, for simple tabs, you can have diagonales using :

.tabrow li:before {
    width: 0px;
    height: 0px;
    border-style: solid;
    border-width: 0 5px 26px 5px;
    border-color: transparent transparent #aaa transparent;
    position: absolute;
    content:" ";
    left:-5px;
    top:4px;
    z-index:-1;
}
.tabrow li:after {
    width: 0px;
    height: 0px;
    border-style: solid;
    border-width: 0 5px 26px 5px;
    border-color: transparent transparent #aaa transparent;
    position: absolute;
    content:" ";
    right:-5px;
    margin-top:4px;
    z-index:-1;
}

Exemple

Of course this is not exactly what you wanted but it can be something to start with.

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Thanks this actually put me in the right direction I think, I got it to look like this: jsfiddle.net/M9aYh/1 however I'm still trying to figure out how can I add the borders –  javiervd Oct 14 '13 at 16:21

CSS3 provides effects for rounded corners, but not diagonal ones. You'll probably just have to use images.

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